Antiquities

Sculpture, painting, jewelry, vases, and objects of daily life from ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria

Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

No Pain, No Rogaine: Hair Loss and Hairstyle in Ancient Rome

Bust of a Flavian Woman / Roman
Bust of a Flavian Woman, Roman, late 1st century. Marble, 26 ¾ in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 73.AA.13

Hairy adventures of the ancient Romans. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

A Hero’s Journey and the Dance of Dragons

Alexander the Great Under Water
Alexander the Great Under Water (detail), about 1400–10, unknown artist, in the World Chronicle. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 33, fol. 220v

Over-the-top tales of Alexander the Great from the pages of medieval manuscripts. More»

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Also posted in Education, Getty Villa

An Epic Performance of Homer’s “Odyssey” by L.A. Sixth Graders

Queen Arete of Phaeacia performs in Ms. Penalosa’s honors-level language arts classroom
Queen Arete of Phaeacia performs in Ms. Penalosa’s honors-level language arts classroom

Students time-travel to ancient Greece through art and theater. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World

A Brief Introduction to Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World

Portrait of a Man / Greek
Copyright © Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Sports/Archaeological Receipts Fund

A guide to these rare and highly expressive artworks. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty360

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Amphorae excavated at Lattes, France
Photo: Michael Dietler

How did wine first come to France? More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

Which Hero Would You Choose for Your Coffin?

Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles / Roman
Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles, A.D. 180–220, Roman. Marble. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 95.AA.80

Three great heroes with equally great flaws. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

15 Deathiest Objects at the Getty Villa

Roman Miniature Posable Skeleton

A death-themed tour of the Getty Villa collection. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

Hopes for a Happy Hereafter

Funerary Vessel with Phrixos on the Ram
Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

How did ancient Italians think about death and the afterlife? More»

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Also posted in Getty Villa

Death Salon Getty Villa: From Ancient Necropolis to LA’s Metropolis

Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles / Roman
Sarcophagus with Scenes from the Life of Achilles, A.D. 180–200, Roman. Made in Athens, Greece. Marble, 83 1/16 in. wide. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 95.AA.80

What is Death Salon—and why? More»

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Also posted in Art, Paintings

#MusePose Gets Physical

MusePose_blog

What’s next in our monthly Instagram challenge? Bring a friend… More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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