Exhibitions and Installations

Thematic exhibitions and gallery installations featuring and complementing the permanent collections

Also posted in Behind the Scenes

A Curator “Visits” the Getty

A child dressed in chain mail at a Getty Center family festival
Kids aren't the only ones who know how to have fun on a Saturday at the museum. The faux-medieval chain mail helps, though.

Does a scholar of manuscripts art enjoy jousting, storytelling, and fun hats? Of course! More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, Getty Villa

Fall 2014 at the Getty

The Devil’s Bagpipes, lithograph in Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami, 1914.
The Devil’s Bagpipes, lithograph in Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami, 1914.

What’s coming up this fall? Too much to miss. More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Minor White and Me

Minor White in Connecticut, 1973 / John J. Weiss
© jjweiss 1973/2014

“There was an interminable pause. Then Minor cleared his throat once more and asked, ‘When can you start?’” More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Curator’s Talk on James Ensor Is a Gas

James_Ensor2

What you need to know about James Ensor, in 12 minutes. More»

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Also posted in Art

Garry Winogrand’s Scenes of Ebulliance, and Unease

Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery
Coney Island, New York. c. 1952. Gelatin silver print, 8 11/16 x 12 15/16" (22 x 33 cm). Purchase and gift of Barbara Schwartz in memory of Eugene M. Schwartz. Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery

A retrospective now at the Met captures America’s postwar “out-of-control-ness” More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Music of a Megalopolis: A Playlist for “In Focus: Tokyo”

Picnic #34, 2005, Masato Seto. 16 15/16 x 21 7/16 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/?p=19524&preview=true&preview_id=19524&preview_nonce=3c13e75aeb#sthash.F66nqPWm.dpuf
Picnic #34, 2005, Masato Seto. 16 15/16 x 21 7/16 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/?p=19524&preview=true&preview_id=19524&preview_nonce=3c13e75aeb#sthash.F66nqPWm.dpuf

A music soundtrack for the exhibition “In Focus: Tokyo.” More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

Power through Prayer

Mummy Portrait of a Boy, about A.D. 150–200, Romano-Egyptian, made in Fayum, Egypt. Encaustic on wood, 8 x 5 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.AP.262

Can a small gold pendant ward off dark forces? More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

An Intimate View of Tokyo

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Picnic #2, 1998, Masato Seto. Silver-dye bleach print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2006.34.1. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto

Four photographers capture an intimate view of the most populous cities in the world: Tokyo. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Villa

Byzantine Los Angeles

Saint Sophia Cathedral, anchor of Los Angeles's Greek Orthodox community and the Byzantine-Latino Quarter
Saint Sophia Cathedral, anchor of Los Angeles's Greek Orthodox community and the Byzantine-Latino Quarter

A visit to the heart of L.A.’s Greek Orthodox community. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Villa

Curators’ Choice: Byzantine Treasures

Pectoral Cross / Greek
Photo © Benaki Museum, Athens

Four treasures not to miss when you visit the Byzantine art exhibition at the Getty Villa. More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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