Manuscripts and Books

Art in bound form, from medieval manuscripts adorned with jewel colors and gold to contemporary artist’s books

Also posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Hero’s Journey and the Dance of Dragons

Alexander the Great Under Water
Alexander the Great Under Water (detail), about 1400–10, unknown artist, in the World Chronicle. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 33, fol. 220v

Over-the-top tales of Alexander the Great from the pages of medieval manuscripts. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

The Sun King Illuminated: An Emblem Book for Louis XIV

Escutcheon with a Landscape / Jacques Bailly
Escutcheon with a Landscape (detail) from Emblems for Louis XIV, text in French and Latin by Charles Perrault, illuminations by Jacques Bailly, about 1663–68. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 11, leaf 5

Sleuthing the symbols of Louis XIV in the Getty Center galleries. More»

Tagged , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Medieval Manuscripts Alive: Middle French

Zrinka Stahuljak in the Manuscripts Study Room at the J. Paul Getty Museum
With the Romance of Gillion de Trazegnies in the Manuscripts Study Room

A chivalrous soap opera, read aloud. More»

Tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Decoding the Medieval Volvelle

Volvelle Animation

It’s part timepiece, part floppy disk, and part crystal ball. More»

Tagged , , , , , , 5 Responses
Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Journey to Marquette

Marquette 2

A curator’s visit to see the French town that one of our precious manuscripts was made in. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Research Papers of Elizabeth Roth, Keeper of Prints and Rare Books at the NYPL

Design for Fireworks Display
This print shows the design for a fireworks display that was scheduled to take place on June 22, 1763, near the Place Louis XV in Paris; the event was in celebration of the treaties marking the end of the Seven Years' War. The display features a façade elevated on a rocky island on the Seine and topped with an equestrian statue placed under a slender arch. Palm trees, exotic animals, putti, and allegorical figures appear among the rocks, while spectators are gathered on the shore.

A life’s work devoted to the unique art of festival books. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Rise and Fall of a Court Artist in Renaissance Italy

Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso
Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso

The unusual life tale of Renaissance illuminator Belbello da Pavia More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Parallel Exhibitions on Renaissance Courts

Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan
Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)
Initial L: The Nativity, Master B. F., about 1542–45. Archivio Storico Civico e Biblioteca Trivulziana, Milan Corale A, fol. 33 (© Comune di Milano. All rights reserved.)

Los Angeles and Milan host parallel exhibitions of illuminated manuscripts. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Deathly Meditations in Medieval Manuscripts

The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v
The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian, Master of Sir John Fastolf, about 1430-40. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 5, fol. 36v

Death is coming. Prepare with these images from illuminated manuscripts. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Manuscript Collector’s Perspective

What draws an art collector to focus on Renaissance manuscripts? More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Corita said that ads and billboards were the carriers of man’s loves, hopes, and beliefs, and that she was restoring life to words by taking them back from advertising. For Corita, “the big G” wasn’t General Mills, it was God; the dots on the Wonder Bread wrapper weren’t a decorative element, they were hosts. But her work was not a commentary or criticism of mass-market commercialism, as some may read it today. Her work was about joy and, she said, giving people an idea of what harmony might look like.

      If she were alive today, I’m sure Corita would still be an advocate for social justice and creating work with a message. I’m sure she would be delighted to communicate with people all over the world through social media. For Corita, looking was a spiritual act and she would invite you to do that: just look.

      Corita Kent, An Artist Who Sees Holiness in Wonder Bread

      All images: Corita Art Center, Immaculate Heart Community, Los Angeles, CA. Photographs by Arthur Evans, courtesy of the Tang Museum at Skidmore College

      08/28/15

  • Flickr