Manuscripts and Books

Art in bound form, from medieval manuscripts adorned with jewel colors and gold to contemporary artist’s books

Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Medieval Manuscripts Alive

Medieval Manuscripts Alive - languages

Hear medieval manuscripts read aloud. First up: Ge’ez, the language of the Ethiopian church. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

When Spray Cans Meet Quill Pens

Work by Krush, featured on a wall curated by Axis at ESMoA’s “Scratch” exhibit 
Courtesy Getty Research Institute
Work by Krush, featured on a wall curated by Axis at ESMoA’s “Scratch” exhibit Courtesy Getty Research Institute

A new exhibition pairs rare books from the 15th to 18th centuries with a contemporary collaboration between Los Angeles graffiti artists. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Middle Ages and Modern Abstraction

The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Michael and Gabriel from Gospel Book, about 1504 - 1505. 13 9/16 x 10 ¼ in. (34.5 x 26.5 cm). MS. 102, FOL. 19V
The Virgin and Child with the Archangels Michael and Gabriel from Gospel Book, about 1504 - 1505. 13 9/16 x 10 ¼ in. (34.5 x 26.5 cm). MS. 102, FOL. 19V

Abstraction was no modern innovation—it’s been an integral part of art across the centuries. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Reading the Future of “Game of Thrones” through Medieval Manuscripts

Job Pointing to a Corpse on the Ground in a Book of Hours, about 1410, Follower of the Egerton Master. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 7 ½ x 5 ½ in. (19.1 x 14 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig IX 5, fol. 147

Do these manuscripts contain the secrets to the “Game of Thrones” season finale? More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

16th-Century Album Records Social Network of Europeans in Istanbul

Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24
Leaf 119 verso and 120 recto from Johann Joachim Prack von Asch’s liber amicorum (book of friends), 1587–1612. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.24

Newly acquired “book of friends” provides insight into European contact with the Ottoman Empire. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Art, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Got Five Minutes? These Artworks Have Something to Tell You

Bust of Madame Recamier, about 1801-1802, Joseph Chinard. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Bust of Madame Recamier, about 1801-1802, Joseph Chinard. J. Paul Getty Museum.

In honor of Slow Art Day, six artworks that reward you for taking your sweet time. More»

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Also posted in Art

Medieval Copyediting

Decorated Canceled Page / Abbey Bible
Detail from a Decorated Canceled Page in the Abbey Bible, about 1250–62. Ms. 107, fol. 96v

Creative editorial practices, courtesy of the Middle Ages. More»

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Also posted in Art

Medieval Reading for Our Favorite “Game of Thrones” Characters

The King of Cyprus Killed by His Brothers, from Froissart’s Chronicles (Book Three), Master of the Getty Froissart, 1480-83.  Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 18 7/8 x 13 ¾ in. (48 x 35 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XIII 7, fol. 80
The King of Cyprus Killed by His Brothers, from Froissart’s Chronicles (Book Three), Master of the Getty Froissart, 1480-83. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment, 18 7/8 x 13 ¾ in. (48 x 35 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XIII 7, fol. 80

Books our favorite “Game of Thrones” characters should consult before heading into season 4. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Medieval Masterpieces from Greece Now on View

The Divine Liturgy of Saint Basil in a liturgical scroll, Vermion, 1100s. Parchment, 26 x 10 in. Image courtesy of the National Library of Greece, Athens, cod 2759  [VEX.2014.2.73]
The Divine Liturgy of Saint Basil in a liturgical scroll, made in Vermion, 1100s. Parchment, 26 x 10 in. Image courtesy of the National Library of Greece, Athens, cod 2759

The largest presentation of Byzantine art ever seen in Los Angeles begins on Greek Independence Day. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Art and Experience in Canterbury and L.A.

Installation view of Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center
Inside Canterbury and St. Albans at the Getty Center. Pages from the St. Albans Psalter, foreground: Bibliothek Hildesheim. Stained-glass panels from the Ancestors of Christ Windows, Courtesy Dean and Chapter of Canterbury

A medieval prayer book was a personal liturgical space. Small and portable, one needed only to open the book to enter. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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