Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Louis XIV as Royal Spectator

Detail of Fireworks on the Grand Canal / Jean Lepautre
Detail of fireworks in Fifth Day: Fireworks on the Grand Canal

Louis XIV appears front-row center in two engravings celebrating his grand parties. More»

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Also posted in Prints and Drawings

Why the Iconic “Great Wave” Swept the World

Under the Wave off Kanagawa / Hosukai
Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The world’s most iconic image of a tsunami isn’t actually a tsunami. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Inside the Photography of Ishiuchi Miyako

Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket
Ishiuchi photographs a detail of the jacket

70 years later, the Hiroshima bombing gives rise to hopeful art. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Secrets of Renaissance Creativity

Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade / Andrea del Sarto
Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade (detail), about 1522, Andrea del Sarto. Red chalk, 6 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 92.GB.74

A curator’s take on Andrea del Sarto. More»

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Also posted in Education, Getty Conservation Institute

Bringing the Cave Temples of Dunhuang to California Classrooms

Our group at the Dunhuang City Museum
Photo: Karen Clancy

Chinese culture comes to California classrooms. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Also posted in Paintings

Five Ways of Seeing Van Gogh’s Irises

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3. Alone

With a little luck and an early arrival to the museum, you just might be able to enjoy Irises alone. If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy that makes it one of my favorite ways to see it.

4. Multiple Times

Detail of IrisesDuring my observations I noticed people often came back to see the painting multiple times in one day. I wonder if it’s due to its emotional complexity. One visitor felt the painting is filled with melancholy and sadness, pointing out Van Gogh’s stay in an asylum and the lone, white flower in the midst of the vibrant, purple irises. On the opposite end of the spectrum, another viewer felt the painting is full of joy, pointing out how vibrant the colors were, and how they manage to rise out of the seemingly dry, brown dirt.

5. Internationally

Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. DH0A5398 One of the great things about art is how we all bring our own perspectives to it. How

Many ways to see a Van Gogh. More»

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Also posted in Paintings

A Pop Soundtrack to the Getty Collection, Vol. 1

Why Hasn't He Called
Young Italian Woman at a Table, about 1895–1900, Paul Cézanne. Oil on canvas. 36 1/4 x 28 15/16 inches. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Music shows off the collection in a new light. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

“Who is this man named J. P. Getty?” M. Knoedler & Co. and Getty the Collector

Portrait of James Christie (1730 - 1803)
Portrait of James Christie, 1778, Thomas Gainsborough. Oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 40 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of J. Paul Getty, 70.PA.16

J. Paul Getty, the mysterious art hunter. More»

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Also posted in Education

Bringing Barbara Kruger’s “Whose Values” into the Classroom

Student with a Whose Values tag

A new lesson plan brings Barbara Kruger’s question-based art project to life for teachers and students More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      Welcome back to #ThyCaptionBe, a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. Every Monday, this will go down on Tumblr and Twitter:

      1. We’ll post a detail.
      2. You guess what in the world is going on and write a caption (questionable accuracy welcome).
      3. Then we’ll share the full illumination and myth-bust if we must.

      Caption away! Can’t wait to see what #ThyCaptionBe.

      08/31/15

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