Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names Released as Linked Open Data

Linked Open Data / Ellora Caves in India

Vast database of geographic places is now available for free download. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Music of a Megalopolis: A Playlist for “In Focus: Tokyo”

Picnic #34, 2005, Masato Seto. 16 15/16 x 21 7/16 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/?p=19524&preview=true&preview_id=19524&preview_nonce=3c13e75aeb#sthash.F66nqPWm.dpuf
Picnic #34, 2005, Masato Seto. 16 15/16 x 21 7/16 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto - See more at: http://blogs.getty.edu/iris/?p=19524&preview=true&preview_id=19524&preview_nonce=3c13e75aeb#sthash.F66nqPWm.dpuf

A music soundtrack for the exhibition “In Focus: Tokyo.” More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

Acrobatic Feats of the Ancient Wine Party

Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky
Fragmentary Mug with a Youth Drinking from a Wine Cup, 510–500 B.C., attributed to near the Theseus Painter, vase-painter; and to the Heron Class, potter. Greek, made in Athens. Terracotta, 6 1/4 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 76.AE.127. Gift of Lynda and Max Palevsky

Wine makes a man do strange things. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Whale Tales and Sea Monsters

Venus on the Waves (detail), 1769, Francois Boucher. J. Paul Getty Museum.
Venus on the Waves (detail), 1769, Francois Boucher. J. Paul Getty Museum.

What is worse than a shark? Oh, that’s right. A lot. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Villa

Power through Prayer

Mummy Portrait of a Boy, about A.D. 150–200, Romano-Egyptian, made in Fayum, Egypt. Encaustic on wood, 8 x 5 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.AP.262

Can a small gold pendant ward off dark forces? More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

An Intimate View of Tokyo

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Picnic #2, 1998, Masato Seto. Silver-dye bleach print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2006.34.1. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Masato Seto

Four photographers capture an intimate view of the most populous cities in the world: Tokyo. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Revisiting a Florentine Master

Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida.  Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in.  Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311
Left: A Bust of a Pope-Saint, about 1310-1315, Pacino di Bonaguida. Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, 35 13/16 x 26 3/8 in. Museo dell’Opera di Santa Croce, Fondo Edifici di Culto, Ministero dell’Interno, Florence. Center: Saint Francis in Antiphonary, about 1320, Pacino di Bonaguida. Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 20 ½ x 13 15/16in. Archivio di Santa Croce, Florence, Corale Q, fol. 121v (Photo: Bryan C. Keene). Right: Chiarito Tabernacle (detail), 1340s, Pacino di Bonaguida. Gilded gesso and tempera on panel, 39 7/8 x 44 11/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 85.PB.311

New research on Pacino di Bonaguida, a central figure in the rise of the Renaissance in Florence. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, Research

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

A Wartime Apocalypse, in Miniature

Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.
Saint John's Vision of the Seven Candlesticks, 1917, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Getty Research Institute.

Tiny, feverish watercolors by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner express the anxious hopes of an entire generation of European artists. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

3D Scanning Meets Ancient Art

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Ancient art is the subject of a 3D scanning pilot at the Getty Museum. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit idiosyncratic. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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