Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Research Institute

14 Fascinating Facts about the Cave Temples of Dunhuang

Interior and sculpture of a bodhisattva in Cave 275 / Cave Temples of Dunhuang
© The Dunhuang Academy

A look at one of the cultural and artistic wonders of the world. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Journey to Marquette

Marquette 2

A curator’s visit to see the French town that one of our precious manuscripts was made in. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations

What You Wrote About Your Deepest Fears

COLLAGE_WHOSEVALUES

You shared, we listened. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty360

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Amphorae excavated at Lattes, France
Photo: Michael Dietler

How did wine first come to France? More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

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Posted in Art

Manifest Destiny Billboard Project Celebrates Its Final Chapter in L.A.

Manifest Destiny Billboard Project / John Baldessari
Photo courtesy of Jennifer Siu-Rivera

An artistic road trip pulls into its final stretch. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Research Papers of Elizabeth Roth, Keeper of Prints and Rare Books at the NYPL

Design for Fireworks Display
This print shows the design for a fireworks display that was scheduled to take place on June 22, 1763, near the Place Louis XV in Paris; the event was in celebration of the treaties marking the end of the Seven Years' War. The display features a façade elevated on a rocky island on the Seine and topped with an equestrian statue placed under a slender arch. Palm trees, exotic animals, putti, and allegorical figures appear among the rocks, while spectators are gathered on the shore.

A life’s work devoted to the unique art of festival books. More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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