Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Glimpse into the Sun King’s Private World

Ivory writing table (detail)
Detail showing the ivory and painted horn

An unusual table once owned by Louis XIV offers a peek into a king’s private world. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV, the Original King of Viral Media

Louis le Grand / Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud
Louis le Grand 1714–1715, Pierre Drevet after Hyacinthe Rigaud. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2011.PR.13

The original tech-savvy celebrity. More»

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Also posted in Getty Center, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Mirror Selfies and Art History

Selfie by Philippe Halbert
Art historian selfie ft. the author

Neoclassical selfies? Check. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Grad Intern Diary: Lisa Banks

Lisa Banks

Digital media, the internship. More»

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Also posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light and Cameraless Action: Community Photoworks 2015

Cyanotype by Quinten Klein
Cyanotype by Quinten Klein

High school students explore cameraless photography with artist Christine Nguyen. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Just In: Fantastic Island

Image from Fantastic Island / Patricia Lagarde
© Patricia Lagarde

An old fishing boat inspires a fantastic tale of heroism and disaster. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

J.M.W. Turner Exhibition Open till 9pm on Its Final Day

Installation view of J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free at the Getty Center
Inside the exhibition at the Getty. More photos on Flickr

Last chance! Exhibition of J.M.W. Turner to remain open late on Sunday, May 24. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute, Miscellaneous

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.
Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.

Thousands of historic negatives from La Raza magazine are being digitized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, Getty Research Institute

LA/LA: Place and Practice

The Political Equator / from a presentation by Teddy Cruz
Courtesy of Teddy Cruz

“We have no reason for coming together other than to be woven together.” More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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