Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Miscellaneous

Noodles Fit for the Mother of God

Detail of Joseph cooking in a Renaissance manuscript

A food historian recreates a dish that Mother Mary may have been served. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

The Original Turducken

Feast with stuffed ox / Hogenber
Feast with stuffed ox (detail), 1530, in Nicholas Hogenber, Procession of Pope Clement VII and the Emperor Charles V after the coronation at Bologna on the 24th February, MDXXX. Hand-colored etching pasted on canvas scroll. The Getty Research Institute

What’s going on here? More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Getty Salad Garden: Ron Finley

Finley1

“Gangsta Gardener” Ron Finley talks about urban farming, creativity, and how food can change your life More»

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Also posted in #GettyInspired, Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photography Pro Tips from Alex Barber

#GettyInspired photographer Alex Barber’s pro-tips on cameras and great shots. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Revitalizing Barbara Hepworth’s Figure for Landscape

Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.
Figure 3: Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness. After treatment on the Fran and Ray Sculpture Terrace.

A behind-the-scenes look at restoring Barbara Hepworth’s 1960 sculpture “Figure for Landscape.” More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Why Aren’t People Eating in Medieval Depictions of Feasts?

Temperate and the Intemperate, Master of the Dresden Prayer Book, miniature from Valerius Maximus, The Memorable Deeds and Sayings of the Romans, Bruges, about 1470-80, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 43, recto
Temperate and the Intemperate, Master of the Dresden Prayer Book, miniature from Valerius Maximus, The Memorable Deeds and Sayings of the Romans, Bruges, about 1470-80, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 43, recto

The medieval struggle to resist sin. More»

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Also posted in Paintings

The Invention of the Light Bulb Did Not Conquer the Night

Moonlight, Wolf / Remington
Moonlight, Wolf, ca. 1909, Frederick Remington. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts(1956.2); gift of the members of the Phillips Academy Board of Trustees on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the Addison Gallery

How painters depicted darkness even as the world embraced artificial light More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Getty Salad Garden: Marcia Reed

Making salad with a curator and a culinary historian. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

A Smartly Costumed Soldier and His Fierce Cat

An Azappo Archer with a Cheetah
An Azappo Archer with a Cheetah, about 1575, Jacopo Ligozzi. Brush, pen and brown ink, tempera colors, and painted gold, 11 1/16 x 8 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 91.GG.53

An extraordinary portrait of a Turkish soldier and his feline sidekick. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings

Celebrating Sugar in “The Edible Monument”

Marcia Reed and Ivan Day
Marcia Reed and Ivan Day installing the sugar sculpture in The Edible Monument

Talking sugar with the chief curator of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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      Gauguin’s Monotypes

      Gauguin is known for his paintings, but also was a skilled maker of the traced monotype. The pencil drawing shows the marks and gestures that Gauguin used to produce the monotype which evokes the erotic dreamscapes that characterize so much of his later work.

      Does the head look familiar? Maybe you’ve seen this horned figure before?

      See more of Gauguin’s monotypes for free from the @philamuseum here, made available through the Getty Research Portal.


      This week’s pick from the Getty Research Portal, a one-stop shop for public domain art history books.

      02/12/16

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