Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Education

The Fine Art of Feasting in Roman Gaul

Pompeiian wall painting depicting autumn produce / Roman, A.D. 70
Wall painting from Pompeii (around A.D. 70) depicting autumn produce, grapes, apples, and pomegranates overflowing a large glass bowl, next to a tilting amphora and a terracotta pot of preserved fruit

A taste of mealtime in ancient France. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Ghost That Wasn’t There

A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7
A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7

What does an invisible ghost look like? Um, well, like this. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

Museum Visitors Write the Rules of 21st-Century Chivalry

Be Aware of Others

Visitors common-sense (and sometimes hilarious) rules for 21st-century behavior. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Delightfully Horrifying Manuscript Illuminations

Halloween5

Selections from the collection for Halloween. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video

See Authentic Medieval Hand-to-Hand Combat in New Video

Details of two men fighting with swords in the medieval manuscript Flower of Battle
Combat with Sword (detail) in Fiore Furlan dei Liberi da Premariacco, The Flower of Battle, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 20v

A new video brings 15th-century fighting moves to life. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Research

Beyond Borders: The Humanities in the Digital Age

Terms for marble in multiple languages, superimposed on a carved marble sculpture of Athena
Selected multilingual terms from the entry for marble in the Art & Architecture Thesaurus

The Web has revolutionized the way we study art and culture. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Photographs, Film, and Video

Mikiko Hara Answers Your Questions about Photography

Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo
Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo

10 questions for Japanese street photographer Mikiko Hara. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Photographs, Film, and Video

Beyond Mikiko Hara’s Viewfinder

Untitled (Is As It), negative 1996; print about 2007, Mikiko Hara. Chromogenic print. 14 x 14 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Mikiko Hara

Why do Mikiko Hara’s photographs look so familiar? More»

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    • photo from Tumblr

      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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