Paintings

Old Master paintings, oil sketches, ancient encaustic portraits, and more

Also posted in Art & Architecture, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

Free Art Wallpapers to Celebrate #MuseumWeek

Vincent van Gogh's Irises as an iPhone background.
Vincent van Gogh's "Irises" makes for a beautiful wallpaper! Irises, 1889, Vincent van Gogh. Oil on canvas.

Van Gogh your devices. More»

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Also posted in #GettyInspired, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

L.A. Band Writes Techno Music Inspired by Van Gogh

rebellion_dancespirit_irises

Van Gogh’s painting inspires a song “Drowning in Irises” by Dance Spirit More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives

Martin Luther King Jr. as Folk Art

MLK Jr. mural at Illa Family Market, 50 Place and S. Vermont Ave., photographed 2004
MLK Jr. mural at Illa Family Market, 50 Place and S. Vermont Ave., photographed 2004

Camilo José Vergara photographs tributes to the civil rights leader on walls across Los Angeles. More»

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Also posted in #GettyInspired, Art & Archives, Getty Center

What’s the Best Way to Learn Painting? Just Start!

Landscape
by Dinuk Magammana

Inspired by master paintings seen at the Getty, self-taught artist Dinuk Magammana began painting from imagination. More»

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Also posted in #GettyInspired, Art & Archives

Talking Art and Whimsical Angst with Painter Jenny Doh

In-studio portrait of Jenny Doh
In-studio portrait of Jenny Doh

Artist Jenny Doh talks on the happy + sad things that inspire her work. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives

The Invention of the Light Bulb Did Not Conquer the Night

Moonlight, Wolf / Remington
Moonlight, Wolf, ca. 1909, Frederick Remington. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts(1956.2); gift of the members of the Phillips Academy Board of Trustees on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the Addison Gallery

How painters depicted darkness even as the world embraced artificial light More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, Editor's Picks

The Color that Changed the Course of Art

Happy Lovers / Fragonard
Happy Lovers, 1760-65, Jean-Honoré Fragonard. Oil on canvas, 35 1/2 x 47 3/4 in. The Norton Simon Foundation, F.1965.1.021.P. © The Norton Simon Foundation

Prussian blue changed it all. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

Louis Style in the Getty Galleries

Detail of frame on Fruit Piece / Van Huysum

13 gorgeous frames from the Golden Age of French frame-making. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Publications

The Miracle of Paul Cézanne’s Watercolors

83.GC.221
Still Life with Blue Pot, 1900–06, Paul Cézanne. Watercolor over graphite, 18 15/16 x 24 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 83.GC.221

Cézanne’s watercolors changed European art forever. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Framing a Frames Exhibition

7

How to hang a frame. More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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