Paintings

Old Master paintings, oil sketches, ancient encaustic portraits, and more

Also posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

The Saints of Skid Row

All the Saints of the City of the Angels / J Michael Walker
© 2013 J Michael Walker

Artist J Michael Walker finds a saint very much alive in downtown Los Angeles. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Knoedler, Mellon, and an Unlikely Sale

Venus with a Mirror / Titian
Venus with a Mirror, about 1555, Titian. Oil on canvas, 49 x 41 9/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1937.1.34. Andrew W. Mellon Collection

One of the most remarkable art sales of the 20th century, as told in documents from the Knoedler archives at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Also posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Seven Works of Art that Make Me Think About Being an American

Hockney_Pearblossom
Pearblossom Hwy., 11-18th April 1986, 1986, David Hockney. © 1986 David Hockney

What work of art screams ‘America’ to you? This is a reflection on works of art that make you think about national identity. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Research

Life Before eBay: British Art Auctions at the End of the 18th Century

britishsales_featured

A major new project traces the rise of the British art market in the late 1700s. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Man of La Belle Ferronière

Image 5_The London Illustrated_July 18 1931_1

A fake Leonardo? The scandalous court case of art dealer Joseph Duveen. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Dear “Woman in Blue,” Let Me Tell You Of…

vemeer_writing_steve_featured

“You will be forgotten. Your image, however, will be immortal. Through it, you will travel far—not by horse and cart, or merchant ship, but through the sky…” More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Makes an Artist Great? Curator Scott Schaefer on Vermeer

Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Johannes Vermeer as installed at the Getty Center
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

Johannes Vermeer is a beloved artist. Is he also a great one? More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Voices

Getty Voices: The Power of Vermeer

vermeer_featured

Vermeer’s newly arrived Woman in Blue Reading a Letter seems calmly at home in our galleries—but introduces a distinctive new presence. More»

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Also posted in Art, Voices

Getty Voices: The Forgotten Surrealist

Wolfgang Paalen with his portrait of Andre Breton
Courtesy Museo Franz Mayer, Mexico City

“A feeling of surprise, even disbelief, that someone so unique could have remained unknown to us for so long.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Write the Opening Line to Vermeer’s “Lady in Blue”

Detail of woman's face and letter in Woman in Blue Reading a Letter / Vermeer
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. On loan from the City of Amsterdam (A. van der Hoop Bequest)

What do you imagine the first line of this letter might say? Share your ideas, and we’ll continue the story. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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