Photographs, Film, and Video

The still and moving photographic image, from the dawn of photography to new experiments in video art, filmmaking, and digital media

Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Mikiko Hara Answers Your Questions about Photography

Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo
Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo

10 questions for Japanese street photographer Mikiko Hara. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Beyond Mikiko Hara’s Viewfinder

Untitled (Is As It), negative 1996; print about 2007, Mikiko Hara. Chromogenic print. 14 x 14 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Mikiko Hara

Why do Mikiko Hara’s photographs look so familiar? More»

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Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Two American Photographers at Home

Wales, boy pushing pram / Bruce Davidson
© Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos

Two American photographers are united through a new exhibition at the Huntington. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Where You and Image Blend”: On Learning from Minor White

Somerville, Massachusetts / Carl Chiarenza
© Carl Chiarenza

“Concentration, contemplation, and meditation were at his core whether making, studying, listening, or engaging. He preferred to be alone with silence, spirit, self.” More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

This Just In: The Sublime in the Everyday

Cookie in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland / Chris Killip
"Cookie" in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Chris Killip’s photographs depict hard-working people in a bleak yet visually stunning setting. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation

Seeing Each Other Differently

Sound of One Hand Clapping / Minor White
Reproduced with permission of the Minor White Archive, Princeton University Art Museum. © Trustees of Princeton University

Art brings a dad and his adult son together. More»

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Also posted in Getty Villa

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations

Minor White and Me

Minor White in Connecticut, 1973 / John J. Weiss
© jjweiss 1973/2014

“There was an interminable pause. Then Minor cleared his throat once more and asked, ‘When can you start?’” More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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