Photographs, Film, and Video

The still and moving photographic image, from the dawn of photography to new experiments in video art, filmmaking, and digital media

Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

See Authentic Medieval Hand-to-Hand Combat in New Video

Details of two men fighting with swords in the medieval manuscript Flower of Battle
Combat with Sword (detail) in Fiore Furlan dei Liberi da Premariacco, The Flower of Battle, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 20v

A new video brings 15th-century fighting moves to life. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Mikiko Hara Answers Your Questions about Photography

Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo
Mikiko with her camera in front of her photograph on view in In Focus: Tokyo

10 questions for Japanese street photographer Mikiko Hara. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

Beyond Mikiko Hara’s Viewfinder

Untitled (Is As It), negative 1996; print about 2007, Mikiko Hara. Chromogenic print. 14 x 14 inches. J. Paul Getty Museum. Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Mikiko Hara

Why do Mikiko Hara’s photographs look so familiar? More»

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Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Two American Photographers at Home

Wales, boy pushing pram / Bruce Davidson
© Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos

Two American photographers are united through a new exhibition at the Huntington. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Where You and Image Blend”: On Learning from Minor White

Somerville, Massachusetts / Carl Chiarenza
© Carl Chiarenza

“Concentration, contemplation, and meditation were at his core whether making, studying, listening, or engaging. He preferred to be alone with silence, spirit, self.” More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

This Just In: The Sublime in the Everyday

Cookie in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland / Chris Killip
"Cookie" in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Chris Killip’s photographs depict hard-working people in a bleak yet visually stunning setting. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation

Seeing Each Other Differently

Sound of One Hand Clapping / Minor White
Reproduced with permission of the Minor White Archive, Princeton University Art Museum. © Trustees of Princeton University

Art brings a dad and his adult son together. More»

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Also posted in Getty Villa

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

100,000 Digitized Art History Materials from the Getty Research Institute Now Available in the Digital Public Library of America

Barnsdall Park / Julius Shulman
Barnsdall Park, Shulman Retrospective (Los Angeles, California), 1969, photographed by Julius Shulman. Print: Frank Taylor. The Getty Research Institute, 2004.R.10 (Job 4460)

There’s a new place to explore digital treasures from the vast collections of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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