Prints and Drawings

Works on paper from the Renaissance to 1900, including European drawings and a vast variety of prints, from Piranesi’s etchings to the first copperplate prints produced in China

Also posted in Art, Art & Archives

Why the Iconic “Great Wave” Swept the World

Under the Wave off Kanagawa / Hosukai
Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The world’s most iconic image of a tsunami isn’t actually a tsunami. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Secrets of Renaissance Creativity

Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade / Andrea del Sarto
Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade (detail), about 1522, Andrea del Sarto. Red chalk, 6 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 92.GB.74

A curator’s take on Andrea del Sarto. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations

A 17th-Century Face-Off

Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre / Robert Nanteuil
Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, 1661. Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60

Masterpieces aren’t the only important objects in art history. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

For Print Collectors, Organizing Is an Art

Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV / Colin
Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV, ca. 1672, Jean Colin. Etching and engraving in Monumens de l’histoire de France, tome 66, an album of prints compiled by the print collector Jean-Louis Soulavie. The Getty Research Institute, 900247

How do you organize 123,400 prints? More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Foundation

Grad Intern Diary: Laurel Garber

L3blog

An eBay bidding war and over 800 pastels, a year in the life of a drawings intern More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, technology

A Cartoon Is a Deadly Weapon

Black-Booker from Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami (Pictures–The Russian War with the Germans), 1914. Getty Research Institute.
Black-Booker from Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami (Pictures–The Russian War with the Germans), 1914. Getty Research Institute.

How simple drawings can foment political upheaval.
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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

This Just In: The Romantic Zeitgeist

A Swan among Reeds by Moonlight, September 18, 1852, Carl Gustav Carus, charcoal with white chalk heightening on brown paper. The J. Paul Getty Museum.
A Swan among Reeds by Moonlight, September 18, 1852, Carl Gustav Carus, charcoal with white chalk heightening on brown paper. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

Three Romantic drawings are on view for the first time. More»

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      Color for Healing

      This sanitorium (tuberculosis hospital) in Paimio, Finland, was designed by architect Alvar Aalto in the 1920s. Unlike many hospitals, it was full of bright colors—including welcoming yellow on the main stairs and calming green for ceilings above bedridden patients. Aalto even created special chairs to open the chest and speed healing.

      The building’s colors were mostly whitewashed later in the 20th century, but now—due to a grant from the Getty Foundation as part of its Keeping It Modern initiative—its colors are being reconstructed and the building preserved for the future.

      More of the story: Saving Alvar Aalto’s Paimio Sanitorium

      Pictured: Paimio Sanatorium, patients’ wing and solarium terraces. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum. A color model for Paimio Sanatorium interiors by decorative artist Eino Kauria. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum, 2016.Paimio chairs (Artek no 41) in the Paimio Sanatorium lecture room, 1930s. Photo: Gustaf Welin, Alvar Aalto Museum. Aino Aalto resting in a chair on the solarium terrace. Photo: Alvar Aalto, Alvar Aalto Museum, 1930s. Main stairs of Paimio Sanatorium. Photo: Maija Holma, Alvar Aalto Museum.

      04/30/16

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