Prints and Drawings

Works on paper from the Renaissance to 1900, including European drawings and a vast variety of prints, from Piranesi’s etchings to the first copperplate prints produced in China

Also posted in Art, Paintings, Photographs, Film, and Video

Dogs Behaving Badly

A Merry Company / Jacob Jordaens
A Merry Company, about 1644, Jacob Jordaens. Watercolor and white gouache heightening over black chalk. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2000.59

Most dogs are impeccably well behaved—in art, anyway. They sit quietly on laps, raise a paw for their beloved master, or contort themselves into perfect S curves. The king of Old Master dogs is Guercino’s heroic mastiff, who looks like… More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Drawings by Contemporaries of Gustav Klimt in W104

Study for Poster: Fruit / Mucha
Study for the poster Fruit, 1897, Alphonse Mucha. Pastel, 25 9/16 x 15 3/8 in. Lent by Eva and Brian Sweeney

The West Pavilion of the Getty Center contains a surprise, the cabinet-like space known as Gallery W104. For the past three years, W104 has hosted a changing display of drawings and watercolors related to exhibitions nearby—most often, the one just… More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Cult of Klimt

Study for the Figure of Lasciviousness (Beethoven Frieze) / Gustav Klimt
Study for the Figure of "Lasciviousness" (Beethoven Frieze), 1901, Gustav Klimt. Black Chalk. Albertina, Vienna, Gift of Elisabeth Lederer

July 14 marks the 150th anniversary of Gustav Klimt’s birth, an event celebrated by exhibitions and events in Vienna and right here at the Getty, with Gustav Klimt: The Magic of Line. This summer, we are in the grips of… More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Gustav Klimt, Draftsman

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Gustav Klimt did not speak about his art, but he left many drawings that attest to the richness of his creative process. Gustav Klimt: The Magic of Line, opening today at the Getty Center, coaxes these drawings to speak, revealing… More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Fragonard’s “Les Beignets”: How Much Sweeter Can Life Be?

Making Fritters (Les Beignets) / Jean-Honore Fragonard

In this time of uncertainty, art can bring pleasure to the eye, nourishment to the mind, and also solace to the heart. A work that does just this is Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s Making Fritters (Les Beignets), an enchanting drawing from about… More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

From Auction to Gallery: A Major Renaissance Portrait Drawing for the Getty

Portrait of a Young Man, Head and Shoulders, Wearing a Cap / Piero del Pollaiuolo

I find auctions terrifying. Mesmerizing, but terrifying. When a major early Renaissance portrait drawing came up for auction at Sotheby’s in New York a month ago, my stomach was in my mouth. It was the sort of drawing one hardly… More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes

The Oakes Brothers’ Final Week at the Getty

Trevor Oakes completes the final panels of his drawing of the Getty’s Central Garden

Ryan and Trevor Oakes are close to completing their three-week drawing project, in which they’ve been rendering the Getty Center and Central Garden exactly as the human eye views it. Their last day here is this Saturday, December 24. Their… More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Double Draw: The Oakes Brothers at the Getty

The Oakes Brothers sketch in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

Twin brothers and artists Ryan and Trevor Oakes have similar interests, which isn’t really unusual for twins. However, the brothers have taken their mutual fascination with vision, light, space, and depth to a whole new level, and have built their… More»

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Also posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Five Tips for Sketching at the Museum

William Zaluski sketching J.M.W. Turner's Modern Rome at the Getty Center

Did you know that visitors to the Getty Museum are allowed—in fact, encouraged—to draw from the artworks in the galleries and on the grounds? Whether drawing to express yourself, to discover rich patterns or details in art, or to create… More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Marilyn Manson, Luminous Poetry, and British Watercolors

Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin
Durham Cathedral and Castle / Thomas Girtin, about 1800. Watercolor over pencil heightened with gum arabic, 14 3/4 x 19 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2010.35

I never expected to witness an evening combining British artists Aubrey Beardsley and Thomas Girtin, goth-rocker Marilyn Manson, Ugly Betty, six contemporary American poets, Stonehenge, improvisational bassist Roberto Miranda, William Blake, and the exhumed body of a Pre-Raphaelite model. Yet… More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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