Prints and Drawings

Works on paper from the Renaissance to 1900, including European drawings and a vast variety of prints, from Piranesi’s etchings to the first copperplate prints produced in China

Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Secrets of Renaissance Creativity

Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade / Andrea del Sarto
Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade (detail), about 1522, Andrea del Sarto. Red chalk, 6 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 92.GB.74

A curator’s take on Andrea del Sarto. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations

A 17th-Century Face-Off

Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre / Robert Nanteuil
Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, 1661. Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60

Masterpieces aren’t the only important objects in art history. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

For Print Collectors, Organizing Is an Art

Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV / Colin
Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV, ca. 1672, Jean Colin. Etching and engraving in Monumens de l’histoire de France, tome 66, an album of prints compiled by the print collector Jean-Louis Soulavie. The Getty Research Institute, 900247

How do you organize 123,400 prints? More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation

Grad Intern Diary: Laurel Garber

L3blog

An eBay bidding war and over 800 pastels, a year in the life of a drawings intern More»

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Also posted in Art

A Cartoon Is a Deadly Weapon

Black-Booker from Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami (Pictures–The Russian War with the Germans), 1914. Getty Research Institute.
Black-Booker from Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami (Pictures–The Russian War with the Germans), 1914. Getty Research Institute.

How simple drawings can foment political upheaval.
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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

This Just In: The Romantic Zeitgeist

A Swan among Reeds by Moonlight, September 18, 1852, Carl Gustav Carus, charcoal with white chalk heightening on brown paper. The J. Paul Getty Museum.
A Swan among Reeds by Moonlight, September 18, 1852, Carl Gustav Carus, charcoal with white chalk heightening on brown paper. The J. Paul Getty Museum.

Three Romantic drawings are on view for the first time. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

This Just In: The Genius of Lithography

The Genius of Lithography / Nicolas Henri Jacob
The Genius of Lithography, 1819, Nicolas Henri Jacob (French, 1781–1871), lithographer. Lithograph, 19.2 x 16.4 cm (sheet 22 x 18.4 cm). Originally published in Alois Senefelder, L'art de la lithographie (Munich, 1819). The Getty Research Institute, 2014.PR.8

The improbable story of the invention of lithography. More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Shark Attack!

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This dynamic painting of a 1749 shark attack in Havana, Cuba, by John Singleton Copley was too good to paint only once. The original hangs at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. A second full-sized version of the painting, which Copley created for himself, was inherited by his son and eventually gifted to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

      The third version (shown here) is slightly reduced in size, with a more vertical composition. It resides in the Detroit Institute of Arts.

      A quick peek into the digitized stock and sales books of art dealer M. Knoedler & Co. at the Getty Research Institute shows the sale of Copley’s masterpiece. It was entered under stock number A3531 in July 1946 and noted as being sold to the Gallery by Robert Lebel, a French writer and art expert. The Knoedler clerk also carefully records the dimensions of the painting—30 ¼ x 36 inches, unframed.

      On the right side of the sales page you’ll find the purchaser listed as none other than the Detroit Institute of Arts. The corresponding sales book page gives the address: Woodward Ave, Detroit, Mich., still the location of the museum.

      Watson and the Shark, 1782, John Singleton Copley. Detroit Institute of Arts

      _______

      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      02/10/16

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