Getty Conservation Institute

Dedicated to advancing conservation practice around the world

Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Education

Graduate Internships Offer Hands-On Opportunities for Emerging Conservation Professionals

Julia Langenbacher conducts an FTIR analysis of an architectural model of a proposal for Disney Hall
Julia Langenbacher conducts an FTIR analysis of an architectural model of a proposal for Disney Hall by architect James Stering in the conservation studio at the Getty Research Institute. With permission of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal

What do graduate interns do all year at the Conservation Institute? Study, travel, learn from colleagues, and launch fascinating careers. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Research, Voices

Behind the Scenes at the GCI | Getty Voices

GCI Lab \ Beril Bicer-Simsir
Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir testing grouts in the Getty Conservation Institute's laboratories.

A relatively new discipline, conservation science merges art and analysis to solve thorny conservation problems. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation

Peru Field Notebook: An Update from Kuño Tambo

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A field team from the Conservation Institute reaches a milestone in its efforts to preserve earthen buildings from earthquakes. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Voices

Getty Voices: The Stones of Rome

Detail of a stone fountain in Rome, Italy, showing damage caused by weathering
Rome is defined by its beautiful stone buildings, bridges, and sculptures. But stone isn't eternal, even in the Eternal City. Photo: Scott S. Warren

Conservators from around the world have gathered in Rome to learn techniques for preserving stone artworks and monuments. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation

The Eames House – Conserving a California Icon

GCI staff Emily Macdonald-Korth carrying out paint excavation on exterior metal work.

A multidisciplinary team is investigating the iconic Eames House in order to preserve it for the future. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation

Architecture Critic Paul Goldberger Advises “Don’t Squeeze Out All the Fresh Air”

Paul Goldberger
Paul Goldberger

“We’re much more sensitive in general to historic buildings than we once were.” How to move forward while preserving the past. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Attic Pots and Atomic Particles

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How did the ancient Greeks make their characteristic red-and-black pottery? Modern science may finally yield the answer. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Voices

Getty Voices: Peru Field Notebook

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Our new Getty Voices series kicks off with a weeklong view into one of the Getty Conservation Institute’s international field projects. More»

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Also posted in Art, Conservation, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings

What Do Rocks Have to Do with Renaissance Art?

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Why the manuscript illuminations in Florence at the Dawn of the Renaissance really rock. More»

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Posted in Getty Conservation Institute

¡América Tropical! Celebrating a Siqueiros Masterpiece

Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.
Asumi on the viewing platform of the América Tropical Interpretive Center.

A few weeks ago, on October 9, the much-anticipated unveiling of the recently conserved mural América Tropical by David Alfaro Siqueiros—one of the great Mexican artists of the 20th century—took place. Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and James Cuno, president… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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