Getty Foundation

The Getty’s philanthropic arm, supporting individuals and institutions committed to advancing the greater understanding and preservation of the visual arts

Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Multicultural Undergraduate Intern Diary: Emily Butts

Emily Butts at the Getty Foundation

Interns in their own words. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Conservation, Philanthropy

Getty Foundation Awards 14 New Grants for “Keeping It Modern”

The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)
The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)

New grants in the Foundation’s modern architecture initiative will help conserve important buildings around the globe. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, technology

Grad Intern Diary: Jacquelyn Clements

Jacquelyn Clements

Studying Greece’s enchanting landscape. More»

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Also posted in Philanthropy, technology

Getty Foundation Launches Searchable Online Grant Database

Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation
Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation

Access to grant data across the Foundation’s entire 30-year history. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Scholarship

Reimagining the Medieval Mediterranean

Norman Stanza, Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily
Photo: Bill Tronzo

Scholars look anew at the medieval Mediterranean. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Scholarship

Thirty-Eight Scholars Will Visit the Getty to Study the Materials of Art and the History of Classical Egypt

Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver
2014–15 scholars Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver in conversation at the Getty Research Institute

Thirty-eight scholars will pursue research at the Getty for coming scholar year. More»

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Also posted in Publications, technology

Grad Intern Diary: Steph Grimes

Steph4_blog

An intern’s year developing digital publications from the ground up. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Grad Intern Diary: Lisa Banks

Lisa Banks

Digital media, the internship. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Miscellaneous

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.
Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.

Thousands of historic negatives from La Raza magazine are being digitized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

LA/LA: Place and Practice

The Political Equator / from a presentation by Teddy Cruz
Courtesy of Teddy Cruz

“We have no reason for coming together other than to be woven together.” More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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