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Also posted in Ancient World, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Grad Intern Diary: Jacquelyn Clements

Jacquelyn Clements

Studying Greece’s enchanting landscape. More»

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Getty Foundation Launches Searchable Online Grant Database

Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation
Screencap of the Getty Foundation's new grant database. Courtesy of the Getty Foundation

Access to grant data across the Foundation’s entire 30-year history. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Scholarship

Reimagining the Medieval Mediterranean

Norman Stanza, Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily
Photo: Bill Tronzo

Scholars look anew at the medieval Mediterranean. More»

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Thirty-Eight Scholars Will Visit the Getty to Study the Materials of Art and the History of Classical Egypt

Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver
2014–15 scholars Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver in conversation at the Getty Research Institute

Thirty-eight scholars will pursue research at the Getty for coming scholar year. More»

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Also posted in Publications

Grad Intern Diary: Steph Grimes

Steph4_blog

An intern’s year developing digital publications from the ground up. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Grad Intern Diary: Lisa Banks

Lisa Banks

Digital media, the internship. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Miscellaneous

The Local Newspaper That Helped Shape a Chicano Identity

Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.
Luis C. Garza, former photographer for La Raza magazine, is helping digitize 20,000 images from its archive.

Thousands of historic negatives from La Raza magazine are being digitized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

LA/LA: Place and Practice

The Political Equator / from a presentation by Teddy Cruz
Courtesy of Teddy Cruz

“We have no reason for coming together other than to be woven together.” More»

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Also posted in Prints and Drawings

Grad Intern Diary: Laurel Garber

L3blog

An eBay bidding war and over 800 pastels, a year in the life of a drawings intern More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Grad Intern Diary: Jennifer Potter

J1

A fruitful year at the Getty Foundation More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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