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Also posted in Art, Paintings, Research

Frederick Hammersley Foundation Donates Archive to the Getty Research Institute

Page from Notebook 3 / Frederick Hammersley
Page from Notebook 3, Frederick Hammersley, 1978. Artwork © Frederick Hammersley Foundation

“Despite their precise lines and construction, Hammersley’s work displays a personal touch, guided by his belief in intuition as an important principle for art making.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

An Agnès Varda Moment for L.A.

Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda
Viva! – Rado – Ragni in LIONS LOVE (…AND LIES), Agnès Varda, 1968. © Max Raab/Agnès Varda

Speaking at the Getty this weekend, the centerpiece of a new LACMA show, and guest artistic director at the AFI Fest—all at age 85. More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

1850s Tehran Revealed in Rare Photographic Album

Tehran, Entrance to Golestan Palace / Luigi Pesce
Tehran, Entrance to Golestān Palace, 1850s, Luigi Pesce. Albumen print in Album fotografico della Persia, 7 1/2 x 9 5/16 in. The Getty Research Institute, 2012.R.18, no. 2

“The album narrates multiple stories that together provide new insights into the rich history of Persia.” More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: From Paint to Pixels

Four color spheres
In Philipp Otto Runge, Farben-Kugel (Hamburg, 1810), plate opposite p. 15 Hand-colored etchings 85-B14217 Research Library, The Getty Research Institute

How do you transform a 19th-century watercolor into a digital logo? More»

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Also posted in Art, Education, Research

5,400 Images from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections Now Available as Open Content

Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu / Chinese
Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu (Kangxi-era lantern patterns), Chinese, 1790. Ink and watercolor, 29.7 x 24 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.M.25

Thousands more images, from Renaissance prints to early photographs, join the Open Content Program. More»

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Also posted in Art, Research

Letters by René Magritte Join Research Institute’s Collection

Photo of Rene Magritte painting Les Promenades d'Euclide, 1955
© 2013 C. Herscovici, London / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The artist’s business dealings with gallerist Alexander Iolas are the focus of nine revealing letters from the 1950s and ’60s. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books, Miscellaneous

What Do Paleographers Do?

paleography_featured

It’s nothing to do with fossils—paleographers are specialists in old handwriting. More»

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Also posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

Treasures from the Vault: The Unexplored Archive of Otto Muehl

Otto Muehl 7
Otto Muehl after Joseph Beuys’s Fat Chair, 1979. The Getty Research Institute, Otto Mühl papers, circa 1918-circa 1997

A peek into the sketchbooks of the controversial founder of Viennese Actionism. More»

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Also posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Artists of the Getty Graffiti Black Book on Style, Street Art, and Special Books

Gorgs
Page by Gorgs from the artists' book L.A. Liber Amicorum

Hear from prominent graffiti artists who helped shape a 143-artist collaboration representing L.A. street art. More»

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Also posted in Art, Paintings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Knoedler, Mellon, and an Unlikely Sale

Venus with a Mirror / Titian
Venus with a Mirror, about 1555, Titian. Oil on canvas, 49 x 41 9/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1937.1.34. Andrew W. Mellon Collection

One of the most remarkable art sales of the 20th century, as told in documents from the Knoedler archives at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

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