Getty Villa

Home to the Getty’s antiquities collection, housed in a re-created Roman villa overlooking the Pacific

Also posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Power in Puppetry

Jenny Greer with a puppet from Tungsten (artery)
Jenny Greer, the voice of Cora

Ancient myth comes to life through the craft of puppetry. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Exhibitions and Installations

Three Ways to Avoid the Freeways: Transport Advice from Apulian Vases

Funerary Vessel with Phrixos on the Ram, 340–310 B.C., Attributed to the Phrixos Group. Created in Ceglie del Campo, Italy, Apulia. Terracotta, 18 1/2 in. diam. Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius
Antikensammlung, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

Sick of driving? Hitch a ride on these mythical creatures. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

Meet Jeffrey Spier, the Getty Museum’s New Antiquities Chief

Getty Museum's senior curator of antiquities, Jeffrey Spier, in the East Garden at the Getty Villa
Getty Museum's senior curator of antiquities, Jeffrey Spier, in the East Garden at the Getty Villa

What the Getty Museum’s new senior curator of antiquities has on his to-do list. More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Fall 2014 at the Getty

The Devil’s Bagpipes, lithograph in Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami, 1914.
The Devil’s Bagpipes, lithograph in Kartinki—voina russkikh s nemtsami, 1914.

What’s coming up this fall? Too much to miss. More»

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Posted in Getty Villa

Experiencing Outdoor Theater at the Getty Villa

Drama at dusk at the Getty Villa

A taste of the outdoor theater experience at the Getty Villa. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Aeschylus’s Persian Queen: An Actor’s Craft

SITI Company rehearses Persians
In rehearsal: Ellen Lauren (foreground) as the queen of Persia; Will Bond (left) as the Messenger

Bringing alive an ancient queen. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

5 Tips for Making the Most of an Arts Internship

Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)
DO participate in meetings! Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)

Road-tested advice for launching your career in an arts organization. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Guide to Aeschylus’s “Persians”

Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery
Play in progress: Ellen Lauren as Persian Queen Atossa against a backdrop of golden drapery. Photo: Sara Radamacher

A theater-goer’s guide to the western world’s oldest play. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Exhibitions and Installations

Power through Prayer

Mummy Portrait of a Boy, about A.D. 150–200, Romano-Egyptian, made in Fayum, Egypt. Encaustic on wood, 8 x 5 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.AP.262

Can a small gold pendant ward off dark forces? More»

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      everyartisthasabday:

      Botticelli’s Mystical Nativity was hidden for many centuries. Once found, it earned its name from both the unusual Nativity symbolism and Greek inscription at the top.

      Boticelli believed he was living through the Tribulation, which is clear in the mysterious inscription:

      This picture, at the end of the year 1500, in the troubles of Italy, I Alessandro, in the half-time after the time, painted, according to the eleventh chapter of Saint John, in the second woe of the Apocalypse, during the release of the devil for three-and-a-half years; then he shall be bound in the twelfth chapter and we shall see [him buried] as in this picture.

      It is the only surviving work with his signature.

      03/02/15

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