J. Paul Getty Museum

Eight thousand years of art on view in two locations, plus a year-round offering of education programs, music, theater, and more

Also posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: Three Drawings from the Dutch Golden Age

A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)
A Hollyhock, 1682, Herman Saftleven (Dutch, 1609-1685). Watercolor, gouache and black chalk, 35.2 x 25.2 cm. © Christie's Images Limited (2014)

A peasant portrait, botanical watercolor, and winter scene join the Getty Museum’s collection More»

Tagged , , , , 2 Responses
Also posted in Art, Education

“L.A. Summer of Learning” Turns the City into an Open-Air Classroom

Los Angeles Summer of Learning

Make your own summer camp with this new citywide program. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Be a Part of “Fuzzy Grids II”

A family builds Fuzzy Grids II at the Getty Center
Building "Fuzzy Grids II" at the Getty Center

Be a part of an oversize living artwork at the Getty Center. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

A Taste of Byzantium

puddingblog

Coming July 19: A four-course dinner inspired by the cuisine of the Byzantine Empire. More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Back to the Future with Chicano Batman

Chicano-Batman-1

They’re not just a Latin band. Five questions for Chicano Batman. More»

Tagged , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books

“The Chivalry Project” Remakes Chivalry for the 21st Century

The Chivalry Project

Contribute to a collective digital rulebook, now through November 30. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa

Power in a Mummy Portrait

Mummy Portrait of Isidora / Isidora Master
Mummy Portrait of a Woman (detail), about A.D. 100–110, attributed to the Isidora Master. Linen, pigment, and gold; encaustic on wood, 18 7/8 x 14 3/16. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 81.AP.42

This woman is still beautiful and self-assured, 2,000 years after her portrait was painted. More»

Tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Transformed by Minor White

Vicinity of Naples, New York / Minor White
The Minor White Archive, Princeton University Art Museum, bequest of Minor White (MWA 55-48). © Trustees of Princeton University

“Two of Minor White’s images helped me to survive.” More»

Tagged , , , 5 Responses
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

“Persians,” An Ancient Play Remade for the 21st Century

Persians by Aeschylus

Director Anne Bogart on remaking the Western world’s oldest play for the 21st century. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 10 Responses
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Behind the Scenes

Designing Heaven And Earth

Galleries of Heaven and Earth at the Getty Villa
Icons glow against "Raspberry Truffle" walls.

Behind the scenes with the design of an exhibition of Byzantine treasures. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      All Hail Tiberius, Least Media-Savvy of the Roman Emperors

      Tiberius was proclaimed Roman emperor on September 17 in AD 14, exactly 2,000 years ago.

      He was also a bit wacko. “He was the least media-savvy emperor you could imagine,” says curator David Saunders, who has been in charge of this bronze portrait of Tiberius which leaves us on September 22. He point to this description found in the writings of Cassius Dio:

      Tiberius was a patrician of good education, but he had a most peculiar nature. He never let what he desired appear in his conversation, and what he said he wanted he usually did not desire at all. On the contrary, his words indicated the exact opposite of his real purpose; he denied all interest in what he longed for, and urged the claims of what he hated. He would exhibit anger over matters that were far from arousing his wrath, and make a show of affability where he was most vexed…In short, he thought it bad policy for the sovereign to reveal his thoughts; this was often the cause, he said, of great failures, whereas by the opposite course, far more and greater successes were attained.

      Moreover, David tells us, “Tiberius’s accession itself was a farrago: Tiberius sort-of feigning reluctance, the Senate bullying him, he being all, ‘Well, if-I-have-to,’ and in the end—according to Suetonius—saying he’ll do it as long as he can retire.”

      Suetonius is full of great, albeit spurious, anecdotes about poor old Tiberius, David reports. “When someone addressed him as ‘My Lord,’ it is said, Tiberius gave warning that no such insult should ever again be thrown at him.”

      Happy accession, My Lord!

      Portrait Head of Tiberius (“The Lansdowne Tiberius”), early 1st century A.D., Roman. The J. Paul Getty Museum

      Statue of Tiberius (detail), Roman, A.D. 37, Soprintendenza Speciale per i Beni Archeologici di Napoli e Pompei – Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, Laboratorio di Conservazione e Restauro. Currently on view at the Getty Villa following conservation and study.

      09/17/14

  • Flickr