J. Paul Getty Museum

Eight thousand years of art on view in two locations, plus a year-round offering of education programs, music, theater, and more

Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Skeletons Carousing in Hell

Stereograph with skeletons and Satan / French, 1860s or 1870s

Skeletons in our closet. More»

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Also posted in Manuscripts and Books

The Ghost That Wasn’t There

A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7
A Monk and Guy’s Widow Conversing with the Soul of Guy de Thurno (detail) in The Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno, Simon Marmion, 1475. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 31, fol. 7

What does an invisible ghost look like? Um, well, like this. More»

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Also posted in Manuscripts and Books

Delightfully Horrifying Manuscript Illuminations

Halloween5

Selections from the collection for Halloween. More»

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Also posted in Manuscripts and Books, Photographs, Film, and Video

See Authentic Medieval Hand-to-Hand Combat in New Video

Details of two men fighting with swords in the medieval manuscript Flower of Battle
Combat with Sword (detail) in Fiore Furlan dei Liberi da Premariacco, The Flower of Battle, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 20v

A new video brings 15th-century fighting moves to life. More»

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Also posted in Art, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Three Reasons to Love Marie-Antoinette

Color print of Queen Marie-Antoinette
Queen Marie-Antoinette, about 1789, Pierre-Michel Alix after Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Etching and wash manner, printed in blue, red, yellow, and black inks, 9 3/16 x 7 1/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Widener Collection, 1942.9.2430. Image courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington

Before her ill-fated end, Marie-Antoinette was a peerless patron of the decorative arts. More»

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Also posted in Art, Education

Barbara Kruger and L.A. Teenagers Team Up to Ask, “Whose Values?”

Hello / Goodbye, an installation by Barbara Kruger at the Hammer Museum
Courtesy of Barbara Kruger. Photo: Brian Forrest

The contemporary artist will work with nearly 500 high schoolers to question, comment, and create. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations

Peter Paul Rubens Unrolls in L.A.

It's almost up!
Tapestry © PATRIMONIO NACIONAL

See how Peter Paul Rubens’s enormous tapestries were installed at the Getty. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

“Where You and Image Blend”: On Learning from Minor White

Somerville, Massachusetts / Carl Chiarenza
© Carl Chiarenza

“Concentration, contemplation, and meditation were at his core whether making, studying, listening, or engaging. He preferred to be alone with silence, spirit, self.” More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

This Just In: The Sublime in the Everyday

Cookie in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland / Chris Killip
"Cookie" in the Snow, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland, 1985, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print, 10 7/8 x 13 3/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.25.11. © Chris Killip

Chris Killip’s photographs depict hard-working people in a bleak yet visually stunning setting. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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