Behind the Scenes

Inside the work of the Getty, from international field projects to maintaining the gardens

Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Bronze God for the Sun King

Belvedere Antinous - detail of head and torso / Tacca
Belvedere Antinous (detail), about 1630, attributed to Pietro Tacca. Bronze, 25 1/2 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2014.40

Travels of a bronze Hermes, from Florence to Paris to L.A. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Getty Villa, Getty360

Getting to Know You

Group photo from the Mojada reading at the Getty Villa
Occidental College grad students with noted Chicano theater scholar Dr. Jorge Huerta at the Getty Villa stakeholder reading.

Playwright Luis Alfaro is remaking Euripides’ Medea for Los Angeles. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

A Look Inside the Getty’s Conservation Collection

Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use
Inside the book Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use (New York: Seeley Brothers, ca. 1886). ID No. 2870-944

From reference tomes to textile cuttings, a collection for every conservation query. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty360

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Amphorae excavated at Lattes, France
Photo: Michael Dietler

How did wine first come to France? More»

Tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Froth and Folly: Nobility and Perfumery at the Court of Versailles

Potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour
Detail of a potpourri holder once owned by Madame de Pompadour. One of a pair of vases (pots-pourris fontaine or pots-pourri à dauphins), about 1760, made at the Sèvres Manufactory with painted decoration attributed to Charles-Nicolas Dodin. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.358

How did Louis XIV’s court smell? More»

Tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Research Papers of Elizabeth Roth, Keeper of Prints and Rare Books at the NYPL

Design for Fireworks Display
This print shows the design for a fireworks display that was scheduled to take place on June 22, 1763, near the Place Louis XV in Paris; the event was in celebration of the treaties marking the end of the Seven Years' War. The display features a façade elevated on a rocky island on the Seine and topped with an equestrian statue placed under a slender arch. Palm trees, exotic animals, putti, and allegorical figures appear among the rocks, while spectators are gathered on the shore.

A life’s work devoted to the unique art of festival books. More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Conservation, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Getty Foundation Awards 14 New Grants for “Keeping It Modern”

The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)
The Solar Observatory Einstein Tower on the Telegrafenberg in Potsdam. Photo: R. Arlt / Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP)

New grants in the Foundation’s modern architecture initiative will help conserve important buildings around the globe. More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

For Print Collectors, Organizing Is an Art

Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV / Colin
Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV, ca. 1672, Jean Colin. Etching and engraving in Monumens de l’histoire de France, tome 66, an album of prints compiled by the print collector Jean-Louis Soulavie. The Getty Research Institute, 900247

How do you organize 123,400 prints? More»

Tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

The Rise and Fall of a Court Artist in Renaissance Italy

Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso
Initial A: Young Christ Blessing (detail) from Antiphonal P of San Giorgio Maggiore, Belbello da Pavia, about 1467-1470. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 96, verso

The unusual life tale of Renaissance illuminator Belbello da Pavia More»

Tagged , , , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Research

Pictures for Education: The Records of Art Dealer M. Knoedler & Co.

16114v.jpg
Booker T. Washington, 1905–45, Harris & Ewing. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-H25- 14111-B

Booker T. Washington appears in the M. Knoedler archive. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

  • Flickr