Education

Learning, teaching, and sharing knowledge, from K–12 and family programs to professional development around the world

Also posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

Photographing with Abelardo Morell | Getty Voices

"How Tall Is It" - a photograph by Mark Twain Middle School 8th grader Ricki Todd
"How Tall Is It" - a photograph by Mark Twain Middle School 8th grader Ricki Todd

Students team up with Abelardo Morell to explore their world through the camera. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

5,400 Images from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections Now Available as Open Content

Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu / Chinese
Lantern design in Kangxi dengtu (Kangxi-era lantern patterns), Chinese, 1790. Ink and watercolor, 29.7 x 24 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2003.M.25

Thousands more images, from Renaissance prints to early photographs, join the Open Content Program. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Art of Suggestion

Poetry of Paper haiku station with visitors

Visitors to the Getty Museum’s exhibition The Poetry of Paper reflect on negative space in the drawings on view by writing haiku. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Dean of Canterbury Cathedral Offers Tales of Art and Creativity

The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury
The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

“Canterbury Cathedral tells the story of England across the centuries since the arrival of St. Augustine in 597—in glass and wood and stone, and in artifacts and music sung daily.” More»

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Also posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Voices

Getty Voices: Preserving the Photographs of the Middle East

Cairo
© Fouad Debbas Collection

Training a new generation of museum professionals to preserve the rich photographs collections of the Middle East. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation

Conserving and Protecting Mosaics in the Mediterranean: The MOSAIKON Initiative

Detail of a mosaic from the Maison de la Nouvelle Chasse, Bulla Regia, Tunisia
Detail of a mosaic from the Maison de la Nouvelle Chasse, Bulla Regia, Tunisia

Featuring over 300 Roman and Byzantine mosaics, Bulla Regia in Tunisia is serving as an outdoor lab for mosaics conservation and training. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Conservation Institute

Graduate Internships Offer Hands-On Opportunities for Emerging Conservation Professionals

Julia Langenbacher conducts an FTIR analysis of an architectural model of a proposal for Disney Hall
Julia Langenbacher conducts an FTIR analysis of an architectural model of a proposal for Disney Hall by architect James Stering in the conservation studio at the Getty Research Institute. With permission of the Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal

What do graduate interns do all year at the Conservation Institute? Study, travel, learn from colleagues, and launch fascinating careers. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books, Research

Thrust, Parry, Download!

Aiming Points on the Body / Fiore dei Liberi, Fior di Battaglia
Aiming Points on the Body (detail), from Fiore dei Liberi, Fior di Battaglia, possibly Venice or Padua, ca. 1410. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, 11 x 8 1/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. Ludwig XV 13, fol. 32

Fight like it’s 1410 with this zesty combat manuscript, free to download via the new Open Content Program. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Trust

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come

The Getty announces its new Open Content Program

A new commitment to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Philanthropy

Connecting the Art Historical Dots

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust
Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy.

A Getty Foundation initiative is expanding the frontiers of art history by bringing scholars together from around the globe. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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