Education

Learning, teaching, and sharing knowledge, from K–12 and family programs to professional development around the world

Also posted in Art, Voices

Getty Voices: The 30-Second Look

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How do you teach students to look—really look—at art? From the classroom to the gallery, longer looking leads to better learning. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Artists Reinventing the Museum, A Google Art Talk with Sam Durant

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Artists are helping museums transform themselves for the 21st century. A conversation. More»

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Also posted in Getty Center, Voices

Getty Voices: “I like art. Now what?”

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How do you make a career in the arts? Ask a question and get an answer this week as Getty Voices talks careers. More»

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Also posted in Art, Photographs, Film, and Video

Time to Focus: Community Photoworks 2013

Student photo by Jesus Martinez
Photo by student Jesus Martinez

“I learned not to rush taking the picture, to capture the moment when you think it’s ready.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Center, Miscellaneous

What #isamuseum? Artist Sam Durant Has 5 Questions for You

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Artist Sam Durant

What #isamuseum? More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Getty Villa, Voices

Getty Voices: Digging the Sacred

Engraved Gem (Snake-legged Creature)
Engraved gem with snake-legged creature, Unknown, Roman, 200 - 400 A.D., The J. Paul Getty Museum.

“I can really appreciate the ancient system where borrowing, amalgamating, and generally mixing it up was perfectly acceptable.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Research

Six Questions for Art Detective Victoria Reed

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What does a provenance researcher do? And how does she do it? More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

What Can We Learn from Artists’ Projects in Museums?

Giant Hand at the Hammer Museum
Machine Project's humorous "Giant Hand" installation at the Hammer Museum tackles wayfinding through humor. Photo courtesy of the Machine Project

More and more museums are inviting artists to go beyond hanging their art on their walls to create engaging visitor experiences inside the museum. At a panel discussion earlier this week, we invited curators, educators, and artists to talk about… More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Project Switch: A Small Game Experiment Yields Big Lessons

Switch is a new in-gallery mobile game at the Getty Center.
Switch game screen

Earlier this year, I worked on an experimental project to create a simple game that would be played in the galleries with a mobile phone (find the game here). The idea came from my colleague Rebecca Edwards (no relation), a… More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Overpromise, Lie, and Other Questionable Political Advice from 64 B.C.

Portrait of Marcus Tullius Cicero with political campaign button

If Karl Rove had lived in ancient Rome, he might have written something like Commentariolum Petitiones, a down-and-dirty electioneering guide from 64 B.C. just published in English by Princeton University Press as How to Win an Election: An Ancient Guide for… More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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