Getty Center

The Getty “off the 405,” designed by Richard Meier and newly turned 15 years young

Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Photographs, Film, and Video

Artists, Educators, and Curators on L.A. and Photography

George Baker, professor of art history at UCLA, offering the keynote address. On screen: photograph by Julia Margaret Cameron
George Baker, professor of art history at UCLA, offering the keynote address. On screen: photograph by Julia Margaret Cameron

Photography turned 175 this year. Audio and recaps from the special celebratory symposium. More»

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Your Music Guide to Saturdays Off the 405

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Liner notes for this season’s outdoor music. More»

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Also posted in Gardens and Architecture, People & Places

Sniff Your Way through the Getty Gardens

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A smell tour of the Getty Center’s flora. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Gardens and Architecture, People & Places

Miniature Getty Center Opens in Philadelphia

Landscape architect's rendering of the Getty Center display at the Philadelphia Flower Show
Landscape architect's rendering of the mini-Getty. Courtesy of Burke Brothers Landscape Design/Build

A landscape designer creates a mini-Getty Center in flowers. More»

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2014 at the Getty | Exhibitions and Events Preview

Bach from Terrain / Yvonne Rainer
“Bach” from Terrain, 1963, Yvonne Rainer. Gelatin silver print. Photo: Al Giese. The Getty Research Institute, 2006.M.24.124

James Ensor, a World War I centennial, photographs from Japan, and all things Queen Victoria this year at the Getty. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Traditional English Recipes with a California Flair

Spotted Dick at the Restaurant at the Getty Center
A contemporary spin on Spotted Dick, the traditional English pudding made with dried fruit. Here it's served with fruit compote and a creamy almond custard

Our chefs share their 21st-century updates on traditional English favorites. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Trust

Why Give Time to the Arts? 6 Questions for Getty Volunteer Stephen Thorne

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Say “Guten Tag!” to Stephen Thorne, one of the Getty Center’s first volunteers. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, technology

Student-Built Día de los Muertos Altar Pays Tribute to L.A.’s Saints

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The altarpiece to Saint Luke, patron saint of artists

A larger-than-life altarpiece featuring Saint Luke occupies the auditorium for Día de los Muertos. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

The Art of Suggestion

Poetry of Paper haiku station with visitors

Visitors to the Getty Museum’s exhibition The Poetry of Paper reflect on negative space in the drawings on view by writing haiku. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Exhibitions and Installations

Dean of Canterbury Cathedral Offers Tales of Art and Creativity

The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury
The Very Reverend Dr. Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury

“Canterbury Cathedral tells the story of England across the centuries since the arrival of St. Augustine in 597—in glass and wood and stone, and in artifacts and music sung daily.” More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

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