Getty Conservation Institute

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation

Conservation Tools: The Microfading Tester

Vincent Beltran uses a microfading tester on a tapestry from the Getty Museum’s collection

Measuring color changes in light-sensitive works of art. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Outdoor Sculpture at Long Beach Campus Gets a Fresh Look

Duet after repainting. Courtesy University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach
Duet after repainting. Courtesy University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach

CSU Long Beach’s remarkable outdoor sculpture collection is being newly conserved More»

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Also posted in Conservation

Yes, L.A. Has a History

Watts Towers
Photo: Stephen Schafer Schafphoto.com

L.A. mayor Eric Garcetti on why historic preservation matters. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation

Moving On Up

Staff visit to the Getty Conservation Institute, being constructed in the 1990s
Senior staff and members of the transition team visit the Conservation Institute during construction.

A look back at the Getty Conservation Institute’s move to the Getty Center. More»

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Also posted in Conservation, technology

Conservation Tools: The Handheld Loupe

Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines a color photographs with a handheld loupe
Getty Conservation Institute project specialist Tram Vo examines color photographs with a handheld loupe to identify the process used to create them.

A handheld magnifying loupe helps conservators study historic photographs with the naked eye More»

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Also posted in Conservation

Conservation Tools: Computer-Aided Design and Drafting

Sara Lardinois, project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute, works on a CAD drawing
Sara Lardinois, project specialist at the Getty Conservation Institute, works on a CAD drawing

Using design and drafting software for conservation. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Conservation

HistoricPlacesLA Catalogues Over 25,000 of L.A.’s Most Significant Buildings and Sites

North Broadway-Buena Vista Street Bridge
North Broadway-Buena Vista Street Bridge

Explore Los Angeles history online with HistoricPlacesLA. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Studying Picasso’s “Woman”

Studying Picasso's Femme at the Getty
Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel, Beyeler Collection. © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

A close look at Picasso’s paints. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, technology

Conservation Tools: Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

Portrait of scientist Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine
Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine

This technique allows conservation scientists to identify materials from the tiniest of samples. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation

Conservation Tools: The Universal Testing Machine (UTM)

Associate Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir placing a building material sample in the Universal Testing Machine.
Associate Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir placing a building material sample in the Universal Testing Machine.

One machine to test them all! More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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