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The Getty’s philanthropic arm, supporting individuals and institutions committed to advancing the greater understanding and preservation of the visual arts

Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Seeing Each Other Differently

Sound of One Hand Clapping / Minor White
Reproduced with permission of the Minor White Archive, Princeton University Art Museum. © Trustees of Princeton University

Art brings a dad and his adult son together. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design

Getty Foundation Announces “Keeping It Modern”

Keeping it Modern / A Getty Foundation initiative to conserve 20th-century architecture

A new initiative focuses on advancing the conservation of modern architecture. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

5 Tips for Making the Most of an Arts Internship

Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)
DO participate in meetings! Corinne (left) and Gaby (center) in a productive meeting with Getty Villa exhibitions coordinator Robin McCarthy (right)

Road-tested advice for launching your career in an arts organization. More»

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Also posted in Art, Scholarship

Summer Camp for Art Historians

Photo: Frettie, CC By-SA 3.0

Three summer institutes convene art historians to push digital art history forward. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Publications

New Digital Publication Zooms in on Claude Monet

image003

New digital catalogue from the Art Institute of Chicago lets you get up close and personal with Monet’s brushstrokes. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Voices

A Vision of Possibilities

Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.
Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.

Every interaction is an opportunity. Thoughts on considering a career in the arts. More»

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Also posted in Philanthropy, Publications, Scholarship

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Marvels of Peter Paul Rubens’s “The Triumph of the Eucharist” Online

Rubens's Triumph of the Eucharist at the Prado
Photo © Museo Del Prado

Paintings and tapestries by the great baroque artist come to the Getty in October. More»

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Also posted in Art, Scholarship

Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA Begins Today

Caixa de fazer amor / Teresinha Soares
Photo: Miguel Aun. Courtesy of Teresinha Soares

A major new initiative to study and celebrate Latin American and Latino art. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation

Giorgio Vasari’s Monumental Painting “Last Supper” Reemerges After Nearly 50 Years

Positioning the panel vertically to align the margins of the joint. Archives of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Firenze.
Positioning the panel vertically to align the margins of the joint. Archives of the Opificio delle Pietre Dure, Firenze.

For the first time in 47 years, the five wooden panels that make up Giorgio Vasari’s “Last Supper” are joined together again to make the artwork whole. More»

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      A Chat with Photographer Tomoko Sawada

      A conversation about Japanese matchmaking traditions, self-portraiture, clothes, and identity.

      When did you start photographing yourself?
      I began making self-portraits when I was 19. It was an assignment for a photography class. I can’t even explain in Japanese why I liked them so much. It was instinctual. It’s as if I knew that this was going to be my style, that this is what I wanted to do. And I’m still doing it because I love the self-portrait, but I don’t know why. 

      What themes are you exploring in your work?
      I’m interested in the relationship between inside and outside. If you wear a sexy dress or if you wear kids clothes or casual clothes, people treat you differently. Even though you are you no matter what you wear. It’s that relationship that makes me think. 

      My new work is from when I was living in New York. When I was in New York, people didn’t think I was Japanese. Sometimes they thought I was Korean or Chines or Mongolian. Even Singaporean. It was funny, when I would go to the Japanese market, they would speak to me in English. When I went to the Korean market, they would speak to me in English again. I don’t seem to look Japanese outside of Japan. I was surprised because I think I look totally Japanese. It’s funny that people’s points of view are totally different.

      Could you talk a little about OMIAI, the series that represents a traditional Japanese matchmaking technique.
      OMIAI is a tradition that is somehow still working today. Usually, there is a matchmaker and photographs are exchanged before meeting. If both sides are interested, they can meet for lunch or dinner accompanied by their parents and steps for marriage proceed from there. In the old days, some people chose their marriage partner just through photographs, without even meeting each other. 

      When OMIAI was exhibited in Japan I saw people making various comments in from of the work. People would say things like, “she looks like a good cook; surely she would prepare delicious meals every day,” or “ this girl could be a perfect bride for my son,” or “I can tell she would not be a good housewife,” or “she’s such a graceful girl; she must be the daughter of a decent family.” Comments like that. 

      What was the process of making that work?
      I gained 10 pounds before I started taking the pictures, and in six months I lost forty pounds, because I wanted to look different in each photo. I wanted to change the way my legs looked. 

      Every weekend I went to the hair salon and put on a kimono. Then I went to the photo studio on the street in Japan. I would take a picture and then change my clothes to western dress. Then I would go to the studio again the next weekend. 

      Did you tell the photographer how you wanted it done?
      I told him I was an artist and wanted to make photographs with him. I told him to think that each weekend new girls would show up to make the OMIAI. I didn’t want him to think of me as the same girl who came every weekend. He understood the concept. 

      We had fun. While he was taking pictures, his wife would tell me how to lose weight. She gave me many tips.


      Tomoko Sawada’s work is on view at the Getty until February 21, 2016 in “The Younger Generation: Contemporary Japanese Photography”

      02/11/16

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