Getty Research Institute

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Also posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

This Just In: 19th-Century “Peep Show” Was the Forerunner of 3D Movies

Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal, detail of etchings
Diorama of King Ludwig’s Canal (detail), about 1846, printed in Germany. Seven hand-colored etchings with front and back boards, each 16 x 22 cm. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.PR.37

Let us marvel at this low-tech wonder from the past. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Remembering Lewis Baltz

Lewis Baltz, Paris, 1992
Lewis Baltz standing in front of his installation, Ronde de Nuit, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 1992

The influential photographer, writer, and teacher has passed. More»

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Also posted in Prints and Drawings, Research

Treasures from the Vault: Heinrich Geissler’s Groundbreaking Archive

Black and white photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow
Study photograph of an unsigned drawing of a man holding a bow

A newly catalogued archive sheds light on how art history was written in Germany after the war. More»

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Also posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books

600 Historic Recipes for Potions, Paints, and Pastes

Screen Shot 2014-11-25 at 2.27.34 PM

Vintage recipes for pretty much anything, for free! More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video, Prints and Drawings

“I Declare War on All Europe”

Zislin

A closer look at two propaganda posters from World War I More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art

Honoring the Legacy of Ladislav Sutnar

Inside the Ladislav Sutnar Faculty of Design and Art
Touring the Ladislav Sutnar Faculty of Design and Art with its dean (center). I am at far right with Steven Heller.

A giant of graphic design is remembered again. More»

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Also posted in Art, Research

Treasures from the Vault: The Guerrilla Girls Archive

Props used in the Guerrilla Girls' actions: plastic gun, bananas, and gorilla fingers with nail polish
Copyright © Guerrilla Girls, courtesy guerrillagirls.com

Why did art professionals put on gorilla masks and take to the streets? More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

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Also posted in Conservation

Preventing Digital Decay

Digitally decayed scan of a book from the Getty Research Institute / Bernard Picart
Crop of a digitally decayed scan of a page from Ceremonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde, representeées par des figures dessinées de la main de Bernard Picard, avec une explication historique, & quelques dissertations curieuses, 1723–1743. The Getty Research Institute, 1387-555

Digital files are fragile. What to do? More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes

Meet FRED!

editFRED

What’s used in law enforcement and at the Getty Research Institute? FRED! More»

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      gettypubs:

      COBALT

      The histories of many colors are amazing, but cobalt may well have the most brilliant of them all. From the Ming Dynasty to Renaissance Italy, cobalt was a popular glaze for porcelain and other ceramics. Cobalt ink is invisible unless exposed to flame, which turns it a vivid green. In the 17th century, this quality made Europeans believe it was witchcraft, but decades later it was used as a neat trick on fire screens. It wasn’t until 1802 that painters added cobalt to their palette. 

      It is this little tidbit from cobalt’s history that saved master forger Han van Meergeren’s skin after WWII, when he was tried for collaborating with the Nazis. Want to find out how some art history sleuthing and smart science got him a not guilty verdict? Hint: Don’t try to forge a Vermeer with cobalt! 

      Read all about it in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Images, clockwise:

      Glazed earthenware dish with a marchant ship, Italy, about 1510. 

      Glazed earthenware tile floor, Spain, about 1425-50.

      Porcelain lidded vase, China, about 1662-1772.

      All objects from the J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      12/18/14

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