Getty Villa

Home to the Getty’s antiquities collection, housed in a re-created Roman villa overlooking the Pacific

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Searching for Murmurs of History

Caption: Elana Mann, Villa Murmurs study, 2014: Photo: Jean-Paul Leonard, courtesy of the artist
Caption: Elana Mann, Villa Murmurs study, 2014: Photo: Jean-Paul Leonard, courtesy of the artist

What does history sound like? More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Curators’ Choice: Byzantine Treasures

Pectoral Cross / Greek
Photo © Benaki Museum, Athens

Four treasures not to miss when you visit the Byzantine art exhibition at the Getty Villa. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Taste of Byzantium

puddingblog

Coming July 19: A four-course dinner inspired by the cuisine of the Byzantine Empire. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Put a Ring On It

Engagement Ring with a Greek Inscription / Byzantine
Image courtesy of the National Archaeological Museum, Athens

One ring and the two women who treasured it. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, J. Paul Getty Museum

Power in a Mummy Portrait

Mummy Portrait of Isidora / Isidora Master
Mummy Portrait of a Woman (detail), about A.D. 100–110, attributed to the Isidora Master. Linen, pigment, and gold; encaustic on wood, 18 7/8 x 14 3/16. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 81.AP.42

This woman is still beautiful and self-assured, 2,000 years after her portrait was painted. More»

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Also posted in Education

What Did the Byzantine Empire Smell Like?

Bottles of aromatics at a recent Getty Villa workshop
Byzantium in a bottle (or two)

Visit medieval Constantinople through perfume you can make yourself. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Persians,” An Ancient Play Remade for the 21st Century

Persians by Aeschylus

Director Anne Bogart on remaking the Western world’s oldest play for the 21st century. More»

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Also posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Free Summer Fun at the Getty

Families participating in Family Art Stops
Families participating in Family Art Stops

Hands-on art programs for kids of all ages at the Getty this summer. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Hidden Beneath the Ruins of Eleutherna

Plaque with the Life of Achilles / Byzantine
Image courtesy of the Rethymno Archaeological Museum

Recently unearthed from the ruins of an ancient city in Greece, a group of carved ivories provides a window into the dawn of Christian art in Byzantium. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center, Miscellaneous

Getty Fountains Temporarily Turned Off to Save Water

NoWater1blog

No water? No problem. Join us in conserving water during the worst drought in California’s recorded history. More»

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      gettypubs:

      COBALT

      The histories of many colors are amazing, but cobalt may well have the most brilliant of them all. From the Ming Dynasty to Renaissance Italy, cobalt was a popular glaze for porcelain and other ceramics. Cobalt ink is invisible unless exposed to flame, which turns it a vivid green. In the 17th century, this quality made Europeans believe it was witchcraft, but decades later it was used as a neat trick on fire screens. It wasn’t until 1802 that painters added cobalt to their palette. 

      It is this little tidbit from cobalt’s history that saved master forger Han van Meergeren’s skin after WWII, when he was tried for collaborating with the Nazis. Want to find out how some art history sleuthing and smart science got him a not guilty verdict? Hint: Don’t try to forge a Vermeer with cobalt! 

      Read all about it in The Brilliant History of Color in Art!

      Images, clockwise:

      Glazed earthenware dish with a marchant ship, Italy, about 1510. 

      Glazed earthenware tile floor, Spain, about 1425-50.

      Porcelain lidded vase, China, about 1662-1772.

      All objects from the J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      12/18/14

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