J. Paul Getty Museum

Eight thousand years of art on view in two locations, plus a year-round offering of education programs, music, theater, and more

Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, Photographs, Film, and Video

Grad Intern Diary: Lisa Banks

Lisa Banks

Digital media, the internship. More»

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Also posted in Education, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light and Cameraless Action: Community Photoworks 2015

Cyanotype by Quinten Klein
Cyanotype by Quinten Klein

High school students explore cameraless photography with artist Christine Nguyen. More»

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Also posted in Art, Paintings

J.M.W. Turner Exhibition Open till 9pm on Its Final Day

Installation view of J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free at the Getty Center
Inside the exhibition at the Getty. More photos on Flickr

Last chance! Exhibition of J.M.W. Turner to remain open late on Sunday, May 24. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

Grad Intern Diary: Rheagan Martin

Rheagan Martin / Graduate Intern

A year of manuscripts, coins, and English weather. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty360

How to Eat Like a Renaissance Courtier

Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas
This istoriato plate bears the coat of arms of the Brescian Calini family and presents the myth of a musical contest between Apollo and the satyr Marsyas. Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas, mid-1520s, Nicola da Urbino. Tin-glazed earthenware, 2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.DE.117

What did the Renaissance Italians really eat? More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books

A Manuscript Collector’s Perspective

What draws an art collector to focus on Renaissance manuscripts? More»

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Also posted in Paintings

Meet the Getty Museum’s New Senior Curator of Paintings, Davide Gasparotto

Davide Gasparotto, senior curator of paintings, Getty Museum

Say hello to the Getty Museum’s new paintings chief. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography

Spin (C-824) / Marco Breuer

Seven photographers revel in process, experiment, chance, and the happy mistake. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty360, Manuscripts and Books

Drink Like a Renaissance Prince

Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)
Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)

Wines good enough for a Renaissance prince. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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