J. Paul Getty Museum

Eight thousand years of art on view in two locations, plus a year-round offering of education programs, music, theater, and more

Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

Grad Intern Diary: Rheagan Martin

Rheagan Martin / Graduate Intern

A year of manuscripts, coins, and English weather. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty360

How to Eat Like a Renaissance Courtier

Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas
This istoriato plate bears the coat of arms of the Brescian Calini family and presents the myth of a musical contest between Apollo and the satyr Marsyas. Armorial Dish with the Flaying of Marsyas, mid-1520s, Nicola da Urbino. Tin-glazed earthenware, 2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 84.DE.117

What did the Renaissance Italians really eat? More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Manuscripts and Books

A Manuscript Collector’s Perspective

What draws an art collector to focus on Renaissance manuscripts? More»

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Also posted in Paintings

Meet the Getty Museum’s New Senior Curator of Paintings, Davide Gasparotto

Davide Gasparotto, senior curator of paintings, Getty Museum

Say hello to the Getty Museum’s new paintings chief. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography

Spin (C-824) / Marco Breuer

Seven photographers revel in process, experiment, chance, and the happy mistake. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty360, Manuscripts and Books

Drink Like a Renaissance Prince

Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)
Left: Initial S: The Conversion of Saint Paul, attributed to Pisanello and the Master of the Antiphonal Q of San Giorgio Maggiore, probably northern Italy, about 1440-1450. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 41, verso. Right: The Italian wine region Colli Piacentini in the Emilia-Romagna province. Photo: Francesco Secchi (Wikimedia Commons)

Wines good enough for a Renaissance prince. More»

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Also posted in Miscellaneous, Photographs, Film, and Video

This Is How Fun Looked in the 1850s

The Billiard Room, Mentmore House / Roger Fenton
The Billiard Room, Mentmore House, about 1858, Roger Fenton. Albumen silver print, 11 15/16 x 12 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2001.27

There’s more to this game of billiards than meets the eye. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Research, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Conserving Barbara Hepworth’s “Figure for Landscape”

Figure for Landscape / Hepworth
Figure for Landscape, 1960, Barbara Hepworth. Bronze, 107 x 52 x 27 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of Fran and Ray Stark, 2005.108. © Bowness, Hepworth Estate

Barbara Hepworth’s bronze figure is conserved. More»

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Also posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

Coming in 2016: Robert Mapplethorpe

Thomas / Mapplethorpe
Jointly acquired by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, with funds provided by The David Geffen Foundation and The J. Paul Getty Trust. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2011.7.31. © Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation

A major retrospective of the artist’s work is coming in March 2016. More»

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Also posted in Art, Education

Be a Fool for Art

#MusePose - Ideal Female Heads
Ideal female heads x4

More fun posing with art! More»

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      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

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