Paintings

Old Master paintings, oil sketches, ancient encaustic portraits, and more

Also posted in Art

Five Ways of Seeing Van Gogh’s Irises

DH0A5376

3. Alone

With a little luck and an early arrival to the museum, you just might be able to enjoy Irises alone. If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy that makes it one of my favorite ways to see it.

4. Multiple Times

Detail of IrisesDuring my observations I noticed people often came back to see the painting multiple times in one day. I wonder if it’s due to its emotional complexity. One visitor felt the painting is filled with melancholy and sadness, pointing out Van Gogh’s stay in an asylum and the lone, white flower in the midst of the vibrant, purple irises. On the opposite end of the spectrum, another viewer felt the painting is full of joy, pointing out how vibrant the colors were, and how they manage to rise out of the seemingly dry, brown dirt.

5. Internationally

Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. DH0A5398 One of the great things about art is how we all bring our own perspectives t

A suggested menu of ways to see Van Gogh’s Irises More»

Tagged , , , , 2 Responses
Also posted in Art

A Pop Soundtrack to the Getty Collection, Vol. 1

Why Hasn't He Called
Young Italian Woman at a Table, about 1895–1900, Paul Cézanne. Oil on canvas. 36 1/4 x 28 15/16 inches. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Music shows off the collection in a new light. More»

Tagged , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Art

The Greatest Muralist You’ve Never Heard Of

Misión
Misión, 2001, Fresno St. at Cesar Chavez, Los Angeles, Manuel G. Cruz

The slowly vanishing murals of Manuel Cruz. More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

J.M.W. Turner Exhibition Open till 9pm on Its Final Day

Installation view of J.M.W. Turner: Painting Set Free at the Getty Center
Inside the exhibition at the Getty. More photos on Flickr

Last chance! Exhibition of J.M.W. Turner to remain open late on Sunday, May 24. More»

Tagged , , , , 2 Responses
Also posted in Art

Portrait of the Artist’s Mother as an Old Woman

Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871, James Abbott McNeill Whistler. Oil on canvas. Paris, Musée d’Orsay © Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY
Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871, James Abbott McNeill Whistler. Oil on canvas. Paris, Musée d’Orsay © Musée d'Orsay, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Art Resource, NY

Who is Whistler’s mother? More»

Tagged , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes

J. M. W. Turner, Now for iPad

iPad sketch by Elke Reva Sudin inspired by J. M. W. Turner’s Blue Rigi—Sunrise
Courtesy of and © Elke Reva Sudin

An artist interprets old master paintings with pixels and stylus. More»

Tagged , , , , , 2 Responses
Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Meet the Getty Museum’s New Senior Curator of Paintings, Davide Gasparotto

Davide Gasparotto, senior curator of paintings, Getty Museum

Say hello to the Getty Museum’s new paintings chief. More»

Tagged , , , , 6 Responses
Also posted in Getty Foundation, Research

New E-Book Explores Early Netherlandish Art

Screen capture showing The Legend of St. Joseph / follower of Robert Campin
Detail of The Legend of St. Joseph, possibly ca. 1490–1500, follower of Robert Campin. Hoogstraten, Church of St. Catherine. From Frames and Supports in 15th- and 16th-Century Southern Netherlandish Painting

New online resource explores panel paintings of the 1400s and 1500s More»

Tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Also posted in Art

Vermeer Taught Me to Love Again

The Milkmaid / Vermeer
The Milkmaid, ca, 1660, Johannes Vermeer. Oil on canvas, 45.5 x 41 cm. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

Vermeer changes a life. More»

Tagged , , 2 Responses
Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

“The Sun Is God”: JMW Turner in Los Angeles

Norham Castle, Sunrise / JMW Turner
Tate: Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Photo © Tate, London 2014

J. M. W. Turner would have felt right at home in Los Angeles. More»

Tagged , , , , 4 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

  • Flickr