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Also posted in Art

How Much Do You Know about Color?

Brilliant History of Color quiz

Take this quiz to learn how much you *really* know about the rainbow. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Foundation

Museum Catalogues from Eight Institutions You Can Now Read Online

The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.
The Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative, or OSCI, led by the Getty Foundation, is finding solutions for the complex task of creating museum publications in a free digital format.

Another online collections catalogue supported by the Getty Foundation has launched More»

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Also posted in Art

My Lifelong Quest for Color

Stained glass window at Chartres Cathedral
Stained glass window at Chartres Cathedral. Photo: Fr Lawrence Lew, O.P., CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Writer Victoria Finlay devotes her life to uncovering the human stories behind colors More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

New Digital Publication Zooms in on Claude Monet

image003

New digital catalogue from the Art Institute of Chicago lets you get up close and personal with Monet’s brushstrokes. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Research

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty from 3 to 5pm: Museum Guidebooks, Then and Now

The Penitent Madgalene / Titian, from The J. Paul Getty Museum Guidebook, second edition

Guidebooks from the ’50s join our Virtual Library. More»

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Also posted in Art, Prints and Drawings

The Human Predicament, in Pastel

Waiting / Degas
Owned jointly with the Norton Simon Art Foundation, Pasadena

An enigmatic pastel shows Degas’s talent for drawing human psychology. More»

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Also posted in Research

New Virtual Library Offers over 250 Art Books for Free Download

45 years of art books for free - Getty Publications Virtual Library

From Cézanne to the silk road, Egypt to earthquakes, our new Virtual Library offers 250+ art titles for free. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

“As Inspiration Dictates”: Henri Matisse on Color

Chatting with Matisse

“Through his own unique voice, Matisse and his work come alive in new and unexpected ways.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video, Research

Getty Conservation Institute Releases Critical New Resource for Conserving Historic Photographs

An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection.
An early carbon photograph by Adolphe Brown, Two Girls (detail), date unknown. Private collection

This new digital publication offers science-based tools to identify how photographs were made. More»

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      ROSE

      This milky pink boomed into popularity because of a marketing ploy, a mistress, and its ambiguous origins.

      In an effort to compete with the renowned Meissen porcelain factory, the French Sèvres manufactory recruited the glamorous Madame de Pompadour (mistress to King Louis XV). Like a smart sponsorship deal, Sèvres gave her all the porcelain she requested. 

      Introduced in 1757, this rich pink exploded on the scene thanks to favoritism by Madame Pompadour herself. 

      The glaze itself had a weird history. To the Europeans it looked Chinese, and to the Chinese it was European. It was made based on a secret 17th-century glassmaker’s technique, involving mixing glass with flecks of gold.

      For more on colors and their often surprising histories, check out The Brilliant History of Color in Art.

      12/19/14

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