Scholarship

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications, technology

“Paper Museum” Goes Digital

Screen capture from Digital Montagny

A 19th-century sketchbook goes digital. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Inside the Papers of Longtime LACMA Curator Maurice Tuchman

Drawing by Maurice Tuchman, 1950
Drawing by Maurice Tuchman, 1950

Inside the papers of the innovative and controversial curator. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, technology

“Who is this man named J. P. Getty?” M. Knoedler & Co. and Getty the Collector

Portrait of James Christie (1730 - 1803)
Portrait of James Christie, 1778, Thomas Gainsborough. Oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 40 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of J. Paul Getty, 70.PA.16

J. Paul Getty, the mysterious art hunter. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, technology

A Look Inside the Getty’s Conservation Collection

Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use
Inside the book Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use (New York: Seeley Brothers, ca. 1886). ID No. 2870-944

From reference tomes to textile cuttings, a collection for every conservation query. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books

Treasures from the Vault: The Research Papers of Elizabeth Roth, Keeper of Prints and Rare Books at the NYPL

Design for Fireworks Display
This print shows the design for a fireworks display that was scheduled to take place on June 22, 1763, near the Place Louis XV in Paris; the event was in celebration of the treaties marking the end of the Seven Years' War. The display features a façade elevated on a rocky island on the Seine and topped with an equestrian statue placed under a slender arch. Palm trees, exotic animals, putti, and allegorical figures appear among the rocks, while spectators are gathered on the shore.

A life’s work devoted to the unique art of festival books. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Pictures for Education: The Records of Art Dealer M. Knoedler & Co.

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Booker T. Washington, 1905–45, Harris & Ewing. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, LC-H25- 14111-B

Booker T. Washington appears in the M. Knoedler archive. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

Reimagining the Medieval Mediterranean

Norman Stanza, Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily
Photo: Bill Tronzo

Scholars look anew at the medieval Mediterranean. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

Thirty-Eight Scholars Will Visit the Getty to Study the Materials of Art and the History of Classical Egypt

Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver
2014–15 scholars Monica Juneja, Matthew Robb, and Larry A. Silver in conversation at the Getty Research Institute

Thirty-eight scholars will pursue research at the Getty for coming scholar year. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, technology

Getty Union List of Artist Names (ULAN) Released as Linked Open Data

ULAN_LOD_600

A third database is released for download and sharing. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Manuscripts and Books, Publications, technology

New Digital Publication Reveals the Workings of Art History

Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681 - home page
The GRI’s first born-digital publication, Pietro Mellini’s Inventory in Verse, 1681

New born-digital book offers a new model for publishing in art history. More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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