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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Treasures from the Vault: Knoedler, Mellon, and an Unlikely Sale

Venus with a Mirror / Titian
Venus with a Mirror, about 1555, Titian. Oil on canvas, 49 x 41 9/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1937.1.34. Andrew W. Mellon Collection

One of the most remarkable art sales of the 20th century, as told in documents from the Knoedler archives at the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Harald Szeemann, From Vision to Nail

Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972 / Balthasar Burkhard
Harald Szeemann during the installation of documenta 5 in Kassel, Germany, 1972. Photo by Balthasar Burkhard. The Getty Research Institute, Harald Szeemann papers, 1892–2010

A five-person team at the Research Institute has finished cataloging Harald Szeemann’s monumental Project Files. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Life Before eBay: British Art Auctions at the End of the 18th Century

britishsales_featured

A major new project traces the rise of the British art market in the late 1700s. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

“The Everlasting Cycle of Becoming and Fading”: Thomas W. Gaehtgens on Philipp Otto Runge’s “Times of Day”

Detail of Night from the Times of Day suite / Philipp Otto Runge

“Runge’s prints represent far more than merely the times of day. The cycle of the day represents in fact the cycle of life.” More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Harald Szeemann’s “Project Files”

Photos of the Venice Biennale from the Harald Szeemann papers
Behind the scenes at the Venice Biennale. At top left, Szeemann inspects construction progress; at bottom right, artwork crates arrive by boat. Undated; photographers unknown. The Getty Research Institute, Harald Szeemann papers, 1892–2010

As director of the Venice Biennale, curator Harald Szeemann created new ways of showing art—and new places to show it. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

The Monuments Men and the Race to Save Masterpieces, A Q&A with Robert Edsel

Robert Edsel
Robert Edsel

“What makes a man risk his life to save someone else’s life, much less a work of art?” More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Paintings

Treasures from the Vault: The Man of La Belle Ferronière

Image 5_The London Illustrated_July 18 1931_1

A fake Leonardo? The scandalous court case of art dealer Joseph Duveen. More»

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Also posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

Getty Voices: Be a Photograph Sleuth

Miriam looks through her handy magnifying glass and light to try to determine the photographic process of this image.
Miriam looks through her handy magnifying glass and light to try to determine the photographic process of this image.

I spend as much of my time looking through a magnifying glass as a classic detective does—solving the mysteries of the Getty’s Department of Photographs. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Attic Pots and Atomic Particles

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How did the ancient Greeks make their characteristic red-and-black pottery? Modern science may finally yield the answer. More»

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      On this day in history, the cornerstone of the United States Capitol was laid by George Washington in 1793.

      Since then, the Capitol has been rebuilt and expanded dramatically (by no less than four different architects).

      This daguerreotype is from a trio of images by John Plumbe, Jr. that form the first photographic record of the site.

      The United States Capitol, 1846, John Plumbe, Jr. J. Paul Getty Museum. 

      09/18/14

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