Voices

Getty Voices is a new series that presents first-person perspectives by members of the Getty community in weekly rotation. Goals and philosophy »

Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation

A Vision of Possibilities

Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.
Keynote speaker Traci Kato-Kiriyama sets the tone for what becomes an eye-opening experience at the Getty.

Every interaction is an opportunity. Thoughts on considering a career in the arts. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, technology

Portraits of Africa, from Colonization to E-Waste | Getty Voices

Triumph of the Will (FARDC Soldiers Demonstrate the Purpose of an Old Belgian Commando Training Structure at Rumangabo Military Base) / Richard Mosse
© Richard Mosse. Courtesy Jack Shainman Gallery

Richard Mosse and Pieter Hugo create arresting portraits that evoke Africa’s colonial past. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Getty Voices: Aztec Idols, Explorers, and Egyptomania

Bust of an Aztec Priestess / Jean Massard the Elder
Bust of an Aztec Priestess, Jean Massard the Elder. Lithograph in Alexander von Humboldt, Vues des Cordillères, et monumens des peuples indigènes de l'Amérique (Paris, 1813), plate 1. The Getty Research Institute, 85-B1535

How did one of the 19th century’s greatest scholars misidentify an Aztec sculpture as Egyptian? Simple: Egyptomania. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute, technology

Encounters with Indigenous Mexico | Getty Voices

The Zocalo, Mexico City / Cartas de relacion
The Zócalo, Mexico City's main square, depicted soon after the Spanish Conquest. Detail from Tenochtitlan, woodcut in Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación (Nuremberg, 1524). The Getty Research Institute, 93-B9631

“There is so much to think over that I do not know how to describe it, seeing things as we did that had never been heard of or seen before, not even dreamed about.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Education, Photographs, Film, and Video, technology

Photographing with Abelardo Morell | Getty Voices

"How Tall Is It" - a photograph by Mark Twain Middle School 8th grader Ricki Todd
"How Tall Is It" - a photograph by Mark Twain Middle School 8th grader Ricki Todd

Students team up with Abelardo Morell to explore their world through the camera. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Art & Archives, Manuscripts and Books

The Search for Cyrus

Cyrus the Great, Founder of the Persian Empire, killed by Thamaris, Queen of the Massagetai; Boucicaut Master Illuminator, French, active about 1390 - 1430; Paris, France, Europe; about 1413 - 1415; Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment; Leaf: 42 x 29.6 cm (16 9/16 x 11 5/8 in.); 96.MR.17.58
Cyrus the Great, Founder of the Persian Empire, killed by Thamaris, Queen of the Massagetai; Boucicaut Master Illuminator, French, active about 1390 - 1430; Paris, France, Europe; about 1413 - 1415; Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, and ink on parchment; Leaf: 42 x 29.6 cm (16 9/16 x 11 5/8 in.); 96.MR.17.58

A look at the representations of king Cyrus of ancient Persia in the Getty’s manuscripts collection. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives

Understanding the Cyrus Cylinder | Getty Voices

The Cyrus Cylinder as installed at the Getty Villa / Achaemenid
The Cyrus Cylinder, Achaemenid, after 539 B.C. Terracotta, 22.9 x 10 cm. The British Museum

Curator David Saunders attempts to fit the need-to-knows about the Cyrus Cylinder into a nutshell. More»

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Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, technology

Getty Voices: From Paint to Pixels

Four color spheres
In Philipp Otto Runge, Farben-Kugel (Hamburg, 1810), plate opposite p. 15 Hand-colored etchings 85-B14217 Research Library, The Getty Research Institute

How do you transform a 19th-century watercolor into a digital logo? More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Getty Voices: Living with the St. Albans Psalter

Conservator's hands holding the parchment of the St. Albans Psalter
Artwork: Dombibliothek Hildesheim. Photo: Peter Kidd

Studying a precious manuscript, page by page, illumination by illumination. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, technology

Getty Voices: Designing Canterbury and St. Albans

The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.
The digital rendering of the installation of the pieces.

Perfectly angled lecterns and a massive glass wall presented plenty of creative challenges for the designers of the exhibition “Canterbury and St. Albans.” More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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