Voices

Getty Voices is a new series that presents first-person perspectives by members of the Getty community in weekly rotation. Goals and philosophy »

Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, technology

Getty Voices: Does Text Still Matter?

Red pens, the editor's stock-in-trade

Where images are the primary sources, where does text fit in? Should museums uphold editorial standards, or go with the Web 2.0 flow? More»

Tagged , 3 Responses
Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations

Getty Voices: Sicilian Journeys

Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome at the Getty Villa
Artwork reproduced by permission of the Regione Siciliana, Assessorato dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana. Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali e dell'Identità Siciliana

A charioteer? A dancer? The Mozia Youth, aguably one of the world’s most breathtaking ancient sculptures, is both mysterious and beautiful. More»

Tagged , , , , , , , : | 6 Responses
Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Getty Voices: What #isamuseum?

Screen Shot 2013-06-10 at 8.22.53 AM

“The project emerged through extended dialogue with members of the Getty Museum’s Education Department, and it was certainly a collaboration.” More»

Tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Getty Voices: The Stones of Rome

Detail of a stone fountain in Rome, Italy, showing damage caused by weathering
Rome is defined by its beautiful stone buildings, bridges, and sculptures. But stone isn't eternal, even in the Eternal City. Photo: Scott S. Warren

Conservators from around the world have gathered in Rome to learn techniques for preserving stone artworks and monuments. More»

Tagged , , , Leave a comment
Also posted in Education, Getty Center

Getty Voices: “I like art. Now what?”

Question_SarahWaldorf

How do you make a career in the arts? Ask a question and get an answer this week as Getty Voices talks careers. More»

Tagged , , , 5 Responses
Also posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Researching the Renaissance

Julian Brooks in Florence with reproductions of Andrea del Sarto's Renaissance drawings
Florence, del Sarto, and I.

“It’s amazing to be immersed in Andrea del Sarto’s home city, his drawings, paintings, frescoes, and his life, normally all so far away when I’m in L.A.” More»

Tagged , , , , , : | 12 Responses
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

My L.A.: The Once and Future Golden Gate Theater

Golden_Gate_Theater_East_Los_Angeles

Hollow and in disrepair, it embodied the reason I wanted to leave Los Angeles. I was wrong. More»

Tagged , , , , : | 20 Responses
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

My L.A.: St. John’s Cathedral, Monument of Serenity

A Romanesque gem in West Adams, St. John's Episcopal Cathedral opened its doors in 1925. Photo: Kansas Sebastian, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Kansas Sebastian, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Though overshadowed by modern icons, beautifully crafted buildings like St. John’s are an important part of our architectural heritage. More»

Tagged , , , , : | 1 Response
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art & Archives

My L.A.: Learning to Love Baskin-Robbins

Burbank Baskin-Robbins ice cream store
Great architecture? Perhaps not. Community hub? Definitely.

What makes a building into a community gathering spot? Sometimes a nondescript exterior gives way to sugary goodness inside. More»

Tagged , , , , : | Leave a comment
Also posted in Architecture and Design, Art, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture, J. Paul Getty Trust, People & Places

Our L.A., Mapped

Screen Shot 2013-05-15 at 8.03.42 AM

What place says “L.A.” to you? What’s your favorite building, corner, or monument? What is your L.A.? More»

Tagged , , , , : | Leave a comment
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ProvenancePeek: Titian in Boston

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, in the collection of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts, is no exception. The MFA carefully details the painting’s Italian provenance on its collection page, but the path of this object even since then is complex.

      Between 1901 and 1907, Portrait of a Man Holding a Book entered the stock of no less than three galleries, purchased from the Italian family who owned it first by Agnew’s in London, then by Trotti in Paris, and then by Cottier in New York (marking its movement from the Old World to the New). A collector purchased it from Cottier, and the painting was held privately for 36 years.

      That collector was Frederick Bayley Pratt (1865–1945), son of Charles Pratt, oil magnate and founder of the Brooklyn Institute that bears his family’s name (incidentally, this writer’s alma mater!). 

      The Knoedler Gallery dealt frequently with members of the Pratt family. A quick peek into the searchable database of Knoedler’s stock books turns up nine instances in which a Pratt (Charles and Mary, Frederick’s parents, or Herbert and John, his brothers) bought works, as well as five instances where they sold works. This Titian portrait is one of those instances. Frederick Pratt sold the work to Knoedler in early April of 1943, and by the 10th, it had been snapped up by the Museum of Fine Arts.

      Knoedler shared the sale with Pinakos, an art-dealing concern owned and operated by Rudolf J. Heinemann. Purchasing works in tandem with other dealers was a widespread practice amongst powerful art galleries of the time; nearly 6,000 records in the Knoedler database had joint ownership.

      The stock books of the Knoedler Gallery have recently been transformed into a searchable database that anyone can query for free. You can find this Titian under stock number A2555.

      Portrait of a Man Holding a Book, about 1540, Titian (Tiziano Vecellio). Oil on canvas. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Charles Potter Kling Fund. Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; stock and sales books documenting the painting’s sale by M. Knoedler & Co.

      _______

      ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archive at the Getty Research Institute.

      04/29/16

  • Flickr