cinema

Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

This Renaissance Sculpture Just Became a French Movie Star

Double Head (detail of face) / Francesco Primaticcio

This Renaissance sculpture stars in a French biopic. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner” Shows Art as Hard Work

Timothy Spall as J. M. W. Turner / Still from Mr. Turner
Photo by Simon Mein, Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

“Leigh’s Mr. Turner is a gentleman by social position, but he’s also a brute laborer, with paint-spattered hands.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Darkly Humorous Czech Films about the Craziness of Politics

Poster for the film The Joke, 1968
Poster for The Joke (Žert), 1968

“What’s so bracing about Czech New Wave films is how honest and artful they are.” More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Discovering “Daisies”

ssedmikr

A film as beautiful as it is weird. More»

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Posted in Getty Research Institute, Photographs, Film, and Video

Two Unforgettable Films about World War I

Still from J'Accuse featuring undead soldiers questioning their sacrifice
Still from J'Accuse

Two classics screen for the war’s centenary. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Tokyo Stories

Still from Adrift in Tokyo / 2007
Courtesy of The Japan Foundation, Los Angeles

Three filmmakers have radically different takes on the city of Tokyo. More»

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Posted in Getty Villa, Photographs, Film, and Video

Orpheus Goes to the Movies

Still from Black Orpheus / Marcel Camus
Still from Black Orpheus (Marcel Camus, 1959). Used with permission from The Criterion Collection.

Two cinematic retellings of the Orpheus myth are both controversial and compelling. More»

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Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video, Voices

Getty Voices: Directing Landscape

werner_herzog

Music and landscape combine to create a powerful “separate reality” in Werner Herzog’s work. More»

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Posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Neon Hitmen

tokyo_featured

Tokyo Drifter, screening this weekend, “smacks you in the face with a bucket of WTF paint.” More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Photographs, Film, and Video

Whispers and Shadows: Ray K. Metzker and “Street Noir”

City Whispers, Philadelphia / Ray K. Metzker
© Ray K. Metzker

“I imagine the people in Metzker’s photographs as supporting characters in a film noir—captured on an average day, precisely at the loneliest moment before the cruel twist of fate takes hold.” More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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