classical plays

Posted in Getty Villa, Getty360

Getting to Know You

Group photo from the Mojada reading at the Getty Villa
Occidental College grad students with noted Chicano theater scholar Dr. Jorge Huerta at the Getty Villa stakeholder reading.

Playwright Luis Alfaro is remaking Euripides’ Medea for Los Angeles. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Aeschylus’s Persian Queen: An Actor’s Craft

SITI Company rehearses Persians
In rehearsal: Ellen Lauren (foreground) as the queen of Persia; Will Bond (left) as the Messenger

Bringing alive an ancient queen. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

“Persians,” An Ancient Play Remade for the 21st Century

Persians by Aeschylus

Director Anne Bogart on remaking the Western world’s oldest play for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Voices

Getty Voices: Backstage at the Villa

AV staff setting up the tech booth in the Getty Villa's Outdoor Classical Theater, July 2, 2013.
AV staff setting up the tech booth in the Outdoor Classical Theater, July 2, 2013.

What does it take create live theater? Art, creativity, plotting, paperwork, energy, love, and tears. Plus lots of caffeine. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, J. Paul Getty Museum

Prometheus Bound: A God Stands Up for Humans’ Rights

Prometheus LA Mag
Look for these posters around town this summer. The photo shows Ron Cephas Jones performing the remarkable feat of embodying Prometheus while anchored to the 23-foot-tall rotating wheel.

Prometheus gave humans fire, and for that he was punished for all of eternity. His story is brought to life in the Villa’s outdoor theater this fall. More»

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Posted in Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

An Interview with the Creative Team behind Euripides’ “Helen” at the Getty Villa

helen

“It’s a whole lot of fun to roll up to rehearse at the Getty Villa on a daily basis,” says Maxwell Caulfield, the actor headlining the Getty Villa’s outdoor theater production of Euripides’ Helen, presented by Playwrights’ Arena. In this… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Reimagining Euripides: A 21st-Century “Trojan Women” at the Getty Villa

Playwright and dramaturg Jocelyn Clarke and SITI Company director Anne Bogart
Playwright and dramaturg Jocelyn Clarke and SITI Company director Anne Bogart

First performed over 2,400 years ago, Euripides’ Trojan Women is one of the most enduring and moving of classical dramas—and one of the greatest antiwar plays. Beginning September 8, renowned New York-based theater troupe SITI Company premieres a newly commissioned… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Thespian Experimentation at the Villa, with Singing Frogs

The Troubadors posing in front of the Getty Villa with their fellow frog actors.

A 2,400-year-old comedy. One week to work on it. Oh yeah—and it’s a musical. The Getty Villa is a hotbed of new ideas about very old theater. In the new Villa Play-Reading Series, translations and adaptations of classical plays are… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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