community service

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Philanthropy

Creativity Blooms at Inner-City Arts on L.A.’s Skid Row

Inner-City Arts
Inner-City Arts is a haven of safety and creativity in the heart of L.A.'s Skid Row.

Getty staff team up to give back to Inner-City arts, a pearl of arts education in the chaos of L.A.’s concrete jungle. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Trust

First Annual Day of Service Is a Hit

Jim Cuno at the Getty's Day of Service, March 11, 2013

Reflections on the Getty’s first annual Day of Service. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Getty Staff Climbs to New Heights—In 1,377 Steps

2011 Getty Community Service team at the American Lung Assocation's Fight for Air Climb

Update—We’re gearing up for the 2013 Fight for Air Climb, scheduled for April 6. More info and how to join us here. The Getty has an active Community Service Team of staff and volunteers who do wonderful things for our… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

VA to the Getty, by Way of the Shuttle

Carrie Brandlin with the mision statement of the VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System

In 2007 the Getty Security department was approached by the VA (Veterans Affairs) to see if we could arrange a visit to the Getty Center for some of the veterans at their facility off Sepulveda Boulevard at Constitution Avenue. Of… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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