conservation

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

A Look Inside the Getty’s Conservation Collection

Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use
Inside the book Seeley Brothers, manufacturers of Averill Paint, ready for use (New York: Seeley Brothers, ca. 1886). ID No. 2870-944

From reference tomes to textile cuttings, a collection for every conservation query. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: The Universal Testing Machine (UTM)

Associate Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir placing a building material sample in the Universal Testing Machine.
Associate Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir placing a building material sample in the Universal Testing Machine.

One machine to test them all! More»

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Posted in Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Google Summer of Code Pairs Up with Arches Project

Google Summer of Code Intern Palash Oswal (left) at an week-long Arches community workshop held in the UK this summer.
Google Summer of Code Intern Palash Oswal (left) at an week-long Arches community workshop held in the UK this summer.

Two Google-sponsored interns combine their interests in cultural heritage and tech development to work on this open-source software system More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute

Science Behind Glass

Getty Conservation Institute scientist Vincent Beltran working on high-tech frames
Photo: S. Warren

Santa Ana winds are no match for these high-tech frames. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

The Flawless L.A. Look

Rachel Rivenc examines a mock-up made from unsaturated polyester resin using compositions corresponding to those used by Los Angeles-based artists in the 1960s and 1970s
Rachel Rivenc examines a mock-up made from unsaturated polyester resin using compositions corresponding to those used by Los Angeles-based artists in the 1960s and 1970s

Conservation scientists are working with L.A. artists to conserve their delicate sculpture. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, J. Paul Getty Museum, Research, Voices

Getty Voices: Attic Pots and Atomic Particles

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How did the ancient Greeks make their characteristic red-and-black pottery? Modern science may finally yield the answer. More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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