cooking

Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chocolate, The Food of the Gods

chocolate-avocado cake with ganache

Eating chocolate, from Moctezuma to Marie-Antoinette. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

What Did Byzantine Food Taste Like?

Spoons with Inscriptions / Byzantine
Image courtesy of and © Benaki Museum, Athens, 2013

In the kitchen with the Byzantines. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Great Literature Inspires Culinary Creations for “Selected Shorts”

Pea tendrils with scallop / Getty Restaurant
Spring on a plate: Pea tendrils over scallop pays humorous homage to Lydia Davis's story "Letter to a Frozen Peas Manufacturer"

Two of life’s pleasures come together this weekend: stories and food. More»

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Posted in Ancient World, Getty Villa

The Ancient Wisdom of Aphrodisiacs

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Tickle your tongue with this seductive cocktail based on ancient aphrodisiacs. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Traditional English Recipes with a California Flair

Spotted Dick at the Restaurant at the Getty Center
A contemporary spin on Spotted Dick, the traditional English pudding made with dried fruit. Here it's served with fruit compote and a creamy almond custard

Our chefs share their 21st-century updates on traditional English favorites. More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

Korean Cooking, the Authentic Fusion Way

Korean cooking at the Getty

Getty chef Mayet Cristobal worked with volunteers from the Korean Cultural Center to create an authentic-fusion menu. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Slaving Over a Hot Medieval Stove

Baking Bread / Unknown illuminator, Belgium
Baking Bread (detail) in a psalter by an unknown illuminator, Belgium, mid-1200s. Tempera colors, gold leaf, and ink on parchment, each leaf 9 1/4 x 6 1/2 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 14, fol. 8v

If cooking for a crowd seems like hard work today, imagine what it must have been like in the Middle Ages, before the advent of electricity, indoor plumbing, or take-out. Two illuminations from a psalter (book of Psalms) offer a… More»

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Posted in Education, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Just Desserts – Gourmet Gothic Sweets

Dessert is served! Participants get ready to savor their Gothic treats

When you hear the word “Gothic,” what comes to mind? Black-lipstick-wearing teens? Cathedrals with flying buttresses? What about lavender pudding or torta bonissima? Students at the Getty learned what tickled the Gothic sweet tooth at a culinary course that featured… More»

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Posted in Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

At the Roman Table: Fish Sauce, Sausage-Stuffed Pig, and Good Conversation

Sally Grainger with porcellum hortolanum at the serving table for At the Roman Table at the Getty Villa

On a recent midsummer’s evening, the Getty hosted a program called At the Roman Table: A Culinary Adventure at the Getty Villa. The event drew 160 guests on each of two balmy evenings to Malibu, where we enjoyed a banquet… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations

“Paris: Life & Luxury”—In Culinary Form

Mayet Cristobal in the kitchen of the Restaurant at the Getty Center

Paris in the mid-18th century was a time of invention in the culinary arts. Food was an integral part of the fashion and culture of this bustling city. Haute cuisine has its foundations in this time and place. So for… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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