drawing

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Researching the Renaissance

Julian Brooks in Florence with reproductions of Andrea del Sarto's Renaissance drawings
Florence, del Sarto, and I.

“It’s amazing to be immersed in Andrea del Sarto’s home city, his drawings, paintings, frescoes, and his life, normally all so far away when I’m in L.A.” More»

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Posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Exhibitions and Installations, Prints and Drawings, Voices

Getty Voices: Looking East, Looking West

Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park
Stephanie and I (seated, far right) with colleagues at the National Museum of Korea, Seoul, in November 2011. Back row, standing: left to right: Lee Jae-jeong, Moon Dong Soo, Min Kil-hong. Front row, seated, left to right: Lee Won Bok, Burglind Jungmann, Stephanie Schrader, Jessie Park

“Looking East” established a platform for international dialogue around art, history, and cultural exchange. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Fragonard’s “Les Beignets”: How Much Sweeter Can Life Be?

Making Fritters (Les Beignets) / Jean-Honore Fragonard

In this time of uncertainty, art can bring pleasure to the eye, nourishment to the mind, and also solace to the heart. A work that does just this is Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s Making Fritters (Les Beignets), an enchanting drawing from about… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Prints and Drawings

Five Tips for Sketching at the Museum

William Zaluski sketching J.M.W. Turner's Modern Rome at the Getty Center

Did you know that visitors to the Getty Museum are allowed—in fact, encouraged—to draw from the artworks in the galleries and on the grounds? Whether drawing to express yourself, to discover rich patterns or details in art, or to create… More»

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Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Draw a Tree with Us—It’s Easy!

Tree drawing by Rebecca Edwards inspired by Myoung Ho Lee's photograph

I have the good fortune to spend my days on a hillside with a view, in buildings filled with artistic treasures and surrounded by gardens. Still, I often amaze myself at how infrequently I take advantage of what’s around me…. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Education, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Drawing from Antiquity: A Chance to Slow Down Time

Artist and drawing enthusiast Jaime Ursic gives a lesson in the Education Studio at the Getty Villa.

Jaime Ursic believes everyone should study drawing. Not just because she’s an artist, but because it gives you two near-magical gifts: looking closely, and slowing down time. She’ll show you how to do both at Drawing from Antiquity, a free… More»

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Posted in Education, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum

Learning from the Old Masters at Getty Drawing Hour

Sketch after Frans Hals's painting Saint John the Evangelist from 1625–28

Looking for opportunities to exercise your creativity in 2011? Consider Getty Drawing Hour, a free program that offers a chance to draw from the Old Masters, with lessons—and plenty of encouragement—from a professional artist. I tried it out on a… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

In the Sketching Gallery, It’s Time to Create!

A visitor to the Sketching Gallery draws from a plaster cast of Adrien de Vries's Juggling Man.
A visitor to the Sketching Gallery draws from a plaster cast of Adrien de Vries's Juggling Man.

Of all my docent duties, helping visitors in the Getty Center’s Sketching Gallery is one of my favorites. What do we offer? The tangibles are not that much: paper, a few pencils, a place to sit, and some works of… More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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