flowers

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Never-Ending Summer in the Central Garden

FallGarden1

Long live summer. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture

September in the Central Garden

Echinacea in the Central Garden at the Getty Center, September 2013

Flowers and foliage give off a feverish display as summer winds, ever so slowly, to a close. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Hi! I’m an L.A. Native.

Cream cups (Platystemon californicus)

They say L.A. has no center; they say it’s a desert. We native Angelenos know that’s not true—and not just when it comes to architecture, either. More»

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Posted in Gardens and Architecture

For California Gardeners, Winter Is the New Summer

European honeybee on tidy tips in the Central Garden

Winter, the sere season? Not in California, where the cool months are our lushest, our most verdant of all. More»

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Posted in Getty Center, Photographs, Film, and Video

Photographic Magic with the Diana Camera

Diana camera

Photographer April Rocha sent us an excited e-mail a while ago, sharing her enthusiasm for the Diana camera, which she noticed was available at the Museum Store at the Getty Center. We asked her to tell us more, and she… More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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