horticulture

Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Getty Gardens: Brown Is the New Green

Green and brown flowers and rocks in the Getty's Central Garden

To adapt to the California drought, the Getty gardens team embraces the brown. More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Gardens and Architecture

A Tree Gets Its Wings

blogeditDH0A0437

As a new tree reaches the end of its life, a new sun garden is born. More»

Also tagged , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Center

Never-Ending Summer in the Central Garden

FallGarden1

Long live summer. More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Sniff Your Way through the Getty Gardens

heliotrope_1_email

A smell tour of the Getty Center’s flora. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Gardens and Architecture

September in the Central Garden

Echinacea in the Central Garden at the Getty Center, September 2013

Flowers and foliage give off a feverish display as summer winds, ever so slowly, to a close. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Art, Gardens and Architecture

Edible Gardening in the Renaissance

gm_00258501_detail

What grew in the Renaissance garden? Many familiar favorites, from cabbage to strawberries. More»

Also tagged , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Hi! I’m an L.A. Native.

Cream cups (Platystemon californicus)

They say L.A. has no center; they say it’s a desert. We native Angelenos know that’s not true—and not just when it comes to architecture, either. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Gardens and Architecture

For California Gardeners, Winter Is the New Summer

European honeybee on tidy tips in the Central Garden

Winter, the sere season? Not in California, where the cool months are our lushest, our most verdant of all. More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

The Moment of Alliums

Coming this summer: Look for sculptural alliums holding their own against the dramatic architecture of the Getty Center
Coming this summer: Look for sculptural alliums holding their own against the dramatic architecture of the Getty Center

It is the week of return—of the vernal equinox, and of the shooting stars—the blue blue-violet alliums in Robert Irwin’s Central Garden at the Getty Center. We’ve been waiting. In late-ish February, green shoots began rocketing from the rich dark… More»

Also tagged , , , 9 Responses
Posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Winter in the Central Garden

Foliage of Eschscholzia california in the rain in the Central Garden at the Getty Center

The Getty’s outdoor spaces are never more beautiful than in the colder months. More»

Also tagged , , , 18 Responses
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour I heard multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

  • Flickr