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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Moving On Up

Staff visit to the Getty Conservation Institute, being constructed in the 1990s
Senior staff and members of the transition team visit the Conservation Institute during construction.

A look back at the Getty Conservation Institute’s move to the Getty Center. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute

Conservation Tools: Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR)

Portrait of scientist Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine
Herant Khanajian in a Getty Conservation Institute lab with an FTIR machine

This technique allows conservation scientists to identify materials from the tiniest of samples. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research, Voices

Behind the Scenes at the GCI | Getty Voices

GCI Lab \ Beril Bicer-Simsir
Scientist Beril Bicer-Simsir testing grouts in the Getty Conservation Institute's laboratories.

A relatively new discipline, conservation science merges art and analysis to solve thorny conservation problems. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Conservation, Getty Conservation Institute, Research

Accelerated Aging Lab: The Scariest Place at the Getty?

Inside the Accelerated Aging Lab: tools for studying rock and mortar. The machine that looks like an industrial Kitchenaid is, in fact, a Kitchenaid—it’s used for mixing lime putty and mortars.

For those of us over 21, the idea of premature aging is definitely not attractive. Every time I pass the Getty Conservation Institute’s Accelerated Aging Lab, I get somewhat apprehensive. But the lab is not intent on hastening wrinkles and… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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