loans

Posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art, Getty Villa

A Winged Chariot, Wilshire Boulevard, and a Shipwreck: The Travels of Triptolemos

Display case at the Getty Villa featuring Red-Figure Neck-Amphora with Triptolemos Attended by Demeter and Persephone
Display case at the Getty Villa featuring, at center, Red-Figure Neck-Amphora with Triptolemos Attended by Demeter and Persephone, about 440–430 B.C., attributed to the Hector Painter. Greek, made in Attica. Terracotta, 19 1/4 in. high. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, William Randolph Hearst Collection (50.8.23)

Retracing the travels of a beautiful Greek vase, from Naples to England to Los Angeles by way of a near miss with the sea floor More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 2 Responses
Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Anatomy of a Horse Painting

The Piebald Horse / Paulus Potter

In George Stubbs’s Brood Mares and Foals, which arrived at the Museum in October as a temporary anonymous loan, horses are sympathetically portrayed within the bucolic landscape of the English countryside. The overriding mood is idyllic, as a small coterie… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: What Makes a Painting a Masterpiece?

Disegno and Colore, Guercino (Giovanni Francesco Barbieri), about 1640. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. Photo © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

What makes a painting a masterwork? Take part in this historic debate about the elements of line and color, as personified by a wise, old man and a sensuous young woman in Guercino’s Disegno and Colore. Italian draftsman and painter… More»

Also tagged , , , 20 Responses
Posted in Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum

Stilt-Walking Actors Extend Their Stay at the Getty Villa

Storage Jar with a Chorus of Stilt Walkers, black-figured amphora attributed to the Swing Painter, Greek (Attic), active about 550-525 B.C. Terracotta, 16 1/8 x 11 7/16 in.  (41 x 29 cm). James Logie Memorial Collection, University of Canterbury

The Art of Ancient Greek Theater closed on January 3, but one loan object from the exhibition won’t be making its way back home for a while. An Attic black-figured amphora, or storage vessel, from the James Logie Memorial Collection at… More»

Also tagged , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Antiquities, Getty Villa, J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Close Look at the Agrigento Youth

Statue of a Kouros (The Agrigento Youth), Greek, about 480 B.C., Museo Archeologico Regionale, Agrigento, Sicily. Photo © Angelo Pitrone

The Agrigento Youth, a Greek sculpture carved almost exactly 2,500 years ago, is wintering at the Getty Villa. It’s the second work from the Museo Archeologico Regionale in Agrigento, Sicily, to visit the Villa on loan, following the Gela Krater,… More»

Also tagged , , , , , , , 1 Response
Posted in Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Travel Postcards, 18th-Century Style

The Grand Canal, Venice, Canaletto, DATE TK. Private collection

Picture this: You’re in the 18th century taking a Grand Tour across Europe, making all the “in” stops such as France and Italy. Before heading back home, you have one final task: buying souvenirs! You’ve taken fencing lessons in Paris,… More»

Also tagged , , , , , Leave a comment
Posted in Art, Getty Center, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

85 Years After John Singer Sargent

Portrait of Therese, countess Clary Aldringen / Sargent
Portrait of Therese, countess Clary Aldringen / Sargent

During the late 19th century, John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) was the most fashionable portrait painter in England and the United States. An example of his iconic style, his Portrait of Thérése, countess Clary Aldringen (1896) is now on view at… More»

Also tagged , , , , , 1 Response
  • Facebook

  • Twitter

  • Tumblr

    • photo from Tumblr

      #ThyCaptionBe: Warnings to the Rich & Powerful

      You captioned this detail. And we’re revealing the full story now.

      It would be awesome if this was Medieval hangman, or a really awkward frat party, but it’s actually the result of a one-letter swap gone wrong in a book about the fates of the rich. 

      Here’s the full story:

      You sometimes regret what pops out unexpectedly when you open your mouth, but in this case, even the fish must have been quite surprised when a wooly lamb burst forth. 

      The stories in this text by Giovanni Boccaccio warn of the terrible fate that often awaits the rich and powerful. He uses here the example of King Polycrates, who tossed a ring into a river, hoping for good luck, and found it later in the mouth of a fish. 

      Someone got confused, though, and instead of a ring (in French, annel), what came out instead was a lamb (agnel). Apparently, neither the ring nor the lamb worked because the king was later hanged (background).

      #ThyCaptionBe is a celebration of modern interpretations of medieval aesthetics. You guess what the heck is going on, then we myth-bust.

      08/31/15

  • Flickr