Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative

Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New Digital Publication Zooms in on Claude Monet

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New digital catalogue from the Art Institute of Chicago lets you get up close and personal with Monet’s brushstrokes. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, Philanthropy, Publications, Research

What Is a Page in the Digital Age?

On Performativity / Walker Art Center
View of the Walker’s new OSCI publication, On Performativity. Image courtesy Walker Art Center

A new crop of digital museum catalogues reinvents the page for the 21st century. More»

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Posted in Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Digital Success, Interactive Reading, and Other Open Questions about OSCI and Digital Publishing

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How do we measure success in digital publishing? What’s better, an app or responsive design? What do we mean by “reading” now? More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, Publications

New SFMOMA Catalogue Gives Museums 5 Reasons to Embrace Digital Publishing

SFMOMA's Rauschenberg Research Project

SFMOMA’s new online catalogue of Robert Rauschenberg’s work harnesses multimedia, archival material, and more. More»

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Posted in Art, Getty Foundation, Publications, Voices

OSCI and The Future of Digital Publishing | Getty Voices

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Digital isn’t just revolutionizing publishing. It’s revolutionizing the museum. More»

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Posted in Antiquities, Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Publications

Developing an Online Scholarly Museum Catalogue

Lollypop Viewer
A glimpse of the disabled "lollipop" viewer with Pendant: Divinity Holding Hares, Etruscan, 600–550 B.C. Height: 97 mm; width: 64 mm; depth: 24 mm; Diameter of suspension holes: 2.5 mm; Weight: 76 g. Gift of Gordon McLendon. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 77.AO.82

We just launched our first online scholarly catalogue, Ancient Carved Ambers in the J. Paul Getty Museum, available at museumcatalogues.getty.edu/ambers. This catalogue was a collaborative effort between our Publications team, the Museum’s curatorial and conservation staff, and the department I… More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Philanthropy, Publications

Online Scholarly Catalogues: Where Are We Now?

Cover of Moving Museum Catalogues Online, a Report from the Getty Foundation

How does the museum collections catalogue, traditionally made for print, fit into today’s world of apps, e-books, and iPhones? It turns out that going digital requires a profound rethinking of the ways in which art historical content can be interactively… More»

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      #ProvenancePeek: July 31

      Every art object has a story—not only of how it was made, but of how it changed hands over time until it found its current home. That story is provenance.

      This small panel by Dutch master Gerrit Dou (photographed only in black and white) is now in the collection of the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. It was sold to American collector Robert Sterling Clark, an heir to the Singer sewing machine fortune, in the summer of 1922.

      How do we know this? Archival sleuthing! A peek into the handwritten stock books of M. Knoedler & Co. (book 7, page 10, row 40, to be exact) records the Dou in “July 1922” (right page, margin). Turning to the sales books, which lists dates and prices, we again find the painting under the heading “New York July 1922,” with its inventory number 14892. A tiny “31” in superscript above Clark’s name indicates the date the sale was recorded.

      M. Knoedler was one of the most influential dealers in the history of art, selling European paintings to collectors whose collections formed the genesis of great U.S. museums. The Knoedler stock books have recently been digitized and transformed into a searchable database, which anyone can query for free.

      Girl at a Window, 1623–75, Gerrit Dou. Oil on panel, 10 9/16 x 7 ½ in. Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts


      #ProvenancePeek is a monthly series by research assistant Kelly Davis peeking into #onthisday provenance finds from the M. Knoedler & Co. archives at the Getty Research Institute.

      07/31/15

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