saints in art

Posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Andrea del Sarto’s Seductive Saints

Saint John the Baptist / Andrea del Sarto
Istituti museali della Soprintendenza Speciale per il Polo Museale Fiorentino. Su concessione del Ministero dei beni e delle attività culturali e del turismo

Why Renaissance artists rendered sacred bodies beautiful and erotic. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Center

Student-Built Día de los Muertos Altar Pays Tribute to L.A.’s Saints

The altarpiece to Saint Luke, patron saint of artists

A larger-than-life altarpiece featuring Saint Luke occupies the auditorium for Día de los Muertos. More»

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Posted in Art, Manuscripts and Books, Paintings

The Saints of Skid Row

All the Saints of the City of the Angels / J Michael Walker
© 2013 J Michael Walker

Artist J Michael Walker finds a saint very much alive in downtown Los Angeles. More»

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Posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations, Manuscripts and Books, Voices

Getty Voices: Saints and Heroes

The Martyrdom of Saint Apollonia / Lieven van Lathem
The Martyrdom of Saint Apollonia, 1469, Lieven van Lathem. Tempera colors, gold leaf, gold paint, silver paint, and ink on parchment, 2 1/2 x 1 13/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Ms. 37, fol. 50v

Saints are all around us, whether we realize it or not. In the Middle Ages, it was even more so. More»

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Posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Christmas Adventures, from Silver Screen to Gilded Page

Alistair Sim as Scrooge repents his selfish ways in the 1951 movie version of A Christmas Carol
Scrooge repents his selfish ways in the 1951 movie version of A Christmas Carol. Courtesy of United Artists

I love Christmas movies, from the moment when Natalie Wood is stunned by Santa Claus speaking Dutch in Miracle on 34th Street to Rudolph setting off with Hermey the dentist in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. One of my other great… More»

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Posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum, Paintings

Question of the Week: How Have You Been Called to Charity?

The Vision of Saint Francis of Paola, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, about 1670. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2003.144

Have you been called to acts of service? Did you answer the call? Saint Francis of Paola, who lived in the 1400s, was called. Two moments of divine intercession are paired in The Vision of Saint Francis of Paola by… More»

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      The Queen Who Wasn’t

      Louis XIV clandestinely wed his mistress, Madame de Maintenon, at Versailles on October 9 or 10, 1683. The marriage was much gossiped about but never openly acknowledged. She was never queen.

      Madame de Maintenon had been the {judgy} governess to Louis XIV’s children by his previous mistress, Madame de Montespan. Louis gave these children moneyed titles—such as the comte de Toulouse, who ordered the tapestries shown here for his residence outside Paris.

      Louis’s secret marriage ushered in a period of religious fervor, in sharp contrast to the light-hearted character of his early reign. Madame de Maintenon was known for her Catholic piety, and founded a school for the education of impoverished noble girls at Saint-Cyr in 1686 that stayed in operation until 1793. This engraving of the Virgin and Child was dedicated to her by the king.

      Virgin and Child, late 1600s, Jean-Louis Roullet after Pierre Mignard; Johann Ulrich Stapf, engraver. The Getty Research Institute. Tapestries from the Emperor of China series. The J. Paul Getty Museum


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