Art

From Stone Age sculpture to contemporary architecture, 6,500 years of art from the collections of the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute

Also posted in Art & Archives, Conservation, J. Paul Getty Museum, Series

An Italian Masterpiece Visits the Getty for Conservation and Study

Getty art handlers place Guercino's Jacob Blessing the Sons of Joseph on an easel.
Getty art handlers place Guercino's Jacob Blessing the Sons of Joseph on an easel.

A collaborative conservation project begins between the Getty and the National Gallery of Ireland More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

Go Mad for Mosaics

Photo by Ryan Dickey, Watts Towers, 2009. Licensed under CC BY 2.0.
Photo: Ryan Dickey

Join us for #MosaicMadness to celebrate mosaics ancient and modern. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

Finding the Fleur-de-Lis in Art

Lidded Bowl on Dish / Sèvres Manufactory
Lidded Bowl on Dish, 1764, Sèvres Manufactory. Soft-paste porcelain with polychrome enamel colors and gilding, 4 7/8 x 7 3/4 x 6 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 78.DE.65

Exploring the royal iris of French art More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives

Game of Thrones, from Pixels to Parchment

The GoT trailer recapped with Getty manuscripts
The GoT trailer recapped with Getty manuscripts

Medieval manuscripts through a Hollywood lens. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, People & Places

Ancient Sculpture Inspires Contemporary Jewelry

Jivita Harris-Casey in her studio
Jivita Harris-Casey in her studio. Photo courtesy of and © Jivita Harris-Casey

Jewelry designer Jivita Harris-Casey crafts silver using centuries-old techniques. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Sculpture and Decorative Arts

A Young Girl Holding Doves

Marble Relief with a Young Girl Holding Doves
Courtesy of www.metmuseum.org

A masterpiece of Greek sculpture is on special loan to the Getty Villa More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Scholarship, technology

Improving Access to Medieval Christian Images

Details from two Medieval Christian artworks: The Dream of Pope Sergius, late 1430s, Workshop of Rogier van der Weyden, and The Meeting of the Three Kings, with David and Isaiah, before 1480, Master of the St. Bartholomew Altarpiece
Details from two Medieval Christian artworks: The Dream of Pope Sergius, late 1430s, Workshop of Rogier van der Weyden, and The Meeting of the Three Kings, with David and Isaiah, before 1480, Master of the St. Bartholomew Altarpiece

A new digital art history project aim to unlock layers of meaning in medieval art More»

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Also posted in #GettyInspired, Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives

Poem for a Victorious Athlete

Detail of the face and shoulders of the Statue of a Victorious Youth / Greek

Of time, frailty, and fleeting victories. More»

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Also posted in Antiquities, Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes

Unlocking the Secrets of Ancient Egyptian Funerary Portraits through Modern Technology

Joy Mazurek, assistant scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, sampling a mummy portrait
Joy Mazurek, assistant scientist at the Getty Conservation Institute, sampling a mummy portrait (J. Paul Getty Museum, 71.AP.72) for binding media analysis.

Funerary portraits yield their secrets. More»

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Also posted in Ancient World, Antiquities, Art & Archives, Getty Villa, technology

A Brief Introduction to Roman Mosaics

Mosaic face from Mosaic Floor with a Bear Hunt / Roman
Detail of a corner panel from Mosaic Floor with a Bear Hunt, A.D. 300–400, Roman, from near Baiae, Italy. Stone tesserae, 51–68 1/2 × 34 1/2–58 ¼ in.

15 key facts about this colorful and long-lasting art form More»

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      A Brief History of the Fleur-de-lis in Art

      The fleur-de-lis, a familiar symbol with varied meanings and a rather obscure origin.

      If you read the labels of objects in museums bearing the fleur-de-lis (in French, fleur de lys, pronounced with the final “s”), you might notice that they were all made in France before the French Revolution of 1789. 

      What’s less apparent is that the fleur-de-lis marks objects that bear witness to a dramatic history of monarchy, democracy, and war: they speak to the inherent power of trappings commissioned for and by France’s pre-revolutionary kings.

      Adopted as a royal emblem in France by the 1100s, the fleur-de-lis can be traced to early Frankish monarchs including Clovis I, who converted to Christianity in 496, and the renowned Charlemagne. 

      A French word, fleur-de-lis translates literally to “lily flower.” This is appropriate given the association of lilies with purity (and the Virgin Mary) and given that France has long been known as the “Eldest Daughter of the Church.” In truth, the stylized flower most closely resembles a yellow iris. 

      As a heraldic symbol used in the arms of the French monarchy, the fleur-de-lis often appears in yellow or gold tones and set on a blue shield. 

      Given its intimate royal associations, the fleur-de-lis invoked the ire of revolutionaries even before the fall of the monarchy in 1792. In addition to toppling royal statues, vandals chipped away at crowns and fleurs-de-lis adorning the façades of buildings.

      Full blog post on the Getty Iris here.

      04/28/16

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