Photographs, Film, and Video

The still and moving photographic image, from the dawn of photography to new experiments in video art, filmmaking, and digital media

Posted in Photographs, Film, and Video

The Seedy, Funky, and Fabulous Hollywood Boulevard of the 1970s

Bus Bench Jesus, Ave Pildas
© Ave Pildas

Hollywood as it was in the ’70s. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Publications

A Brief History of Animals in Photography

In the Box/Out of the Box / William Wegman
© William Wegman

Animals as photographic subject. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum

Grad Intern Diary: Lisa Banks

Lisa Banks

Digital media, the internship. More»

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Also posted in Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

Light and Cameraless Action: Community Photoworks 2015

Cyanotype by Quinten Klein
Cyanotype by Quinten Klein

High school students explore cameraless photography with artist Christine Nguyen. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

This Just In: Fantastic Island

Image from Fantastic Island / Patricia Lagarde
© Patricia Lagarde

An old fishing boat inspires a fantastic tale of heroism and disaster. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute

Treasures from the Vault: Malcolm Lubliner’s Photographs of the L.A. Art Scene

Jasper Johns, 1968, Malcolm Lubliner
© Malcolm Lubliner Photograph

Photographic portraits of some of the 20th century’s most notable artists. More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

A Re-Imagined Getty, Drenched in Color

Video still
Video still

A video inspired by photographic history and 20th-century art. More»

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Also posted in Art

Of Mice (Murder) and Men (With Cowboy Hats)

Untitled [Renée Cotta at Kings District Fair], 1966, photographer unknown
Untitled [Renée Cotta at Kings District Fair], 1966, photographer unknown

A photographer “introduces rural California to urban California for what it really is.” More»

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Also posted in Art, Exhibitions and Installations

Snapshots of a Human Petri Dish

Photo 3, 2014, Lars Jan. Courtesy of Pasadena Museum of California Art.
Photo 3, 2014, Lars Jan. Courtesy of Pasadena Museum of California Art.

Climate change and photography. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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