Prints and Drawings

Works on paper from the Renaissance to 1900, including European drawings and a vast variety of prints, from Piranesi’s etchings to the first copperplate prints produced in China

Also posted in Getty Research Institute

Six Meditations on Versailles

Bird's-Eye View of the Castle of Versailles, Its Gardens and Surroundings, as Seen from the Orangerie / Antoine Coquart
Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Va-422-format 4. Photo credit: BnF

A 1712 print depicts the palace of Versailles as capital of politics and pleasure. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV as Royal Spectator

Detail of Fireworks on the Grand Canal / Jean Lepautre
Detail of fireworks in Fifth Day: Fireworks on the Grand Canal

Louis XIV appears front-row center in two engravings celebrating his grand parties. More»

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Also posted in Art

Why the Iconic “Great Wave” Swept the World

Under the Wave off Kanagawa / Hosukai
Photograph © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The world’s most iconic image of a tsunami isn’t actually a tsunami. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum

The Secrets of Renaissance Creativity

Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade / Andrea del Sarto
Studies of Figures behind a Balustrade (detail), about 1522, Andrea del Sarto. Red chalk, 6 7/8 x 7 7/8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 92.GB.74

A curator’s take on Andrea del Sarto. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations

A 17th-Century Face-Off

Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre / Robert Nanteuil
Louis XIV, King of France and Navarre, 1661. Robert Nanteuil after Nicolas Mignard. Engraving. The Getty Research Institute, 2010.PR.60

Masterpieces aren’t the only important objects in art history. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

For Print Collectors, Organizing Is an Art

Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV / Colin
Equestrian Portrait of Louis XIV, ca. 1672, Jean Colin. Etching and engraving in Monumens de l’histoire de France, tome 66, an album of prints compiled by the print collector Jean-Louis Soulavie. The Getty Research Institute, 900247

How do you organize 123,400 prints? More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

Louis XIV’s Golden Dome

Facade of the Church of the Invalides / Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart
Facade of the Church of the Invalides, 1687, Pierre Lepautre after Jules Hardouin-Mansart. Etching and engraving from a bound volume of 14 prints (Bâtiments du roi, Paris, 1687). The Getty Research Institute, 1392-604

A rare print for the dome of the Invalides in Paris reflects Louis XIV’s ambitions to make Paris “a new European center of architectural magnificence.” More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation

Grad Intern Diary: Laurel Garber

L3blog

An eBay bidding war and over 800 pastels, a year in the life of a drawings intern More»

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      Made with sweat and tears, literally

      Matthew Brandt incorporates the elements of his subject into the making—or unmaking—of his photographs. From lake water to sweat to saliva to tears, particles of the world in which he photographs influence the making of the print. 

      His photographs are now on view (with 5 other contemporary photographers) in Light, Paper, Process open through September 6.


      Rainbow Lake, WY A4, negative 2012; print 2013, Matthew Brandt. Chromogenic print, soaked in Rainbow Lake water, 30 x 40 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council, 2014.16.2. © Matthew Brandt

      Will, 2007, Matthew Brandt. Salted paper print with tears, 2 5/8 x 2 in. Courtesy of the artist, Yossi Milo Gallery, New York and M+B Gallery, Los Angeles. © Matthew Brandt

      08/27/15

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