Prints and Drawings

Works on paper from the Renaissance to 1900, including European drawings and a vast variety of prints, from Piranesi’s etchings to the first copperplate prints produced in China

Also posted in Art, Art & Archives

“Black is the most essential color”: Odilon Redon’s Noirs

Apparition (detail) / Odilon Redon
Detail of Apparition showing the combination of charcoal and pastel

A fascination with darkness, insomnia, and dreams More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum

Behind the Scenes of a Special Exhibition at the Getty

Maxime LaLanne / Castle Overlooking a River
Gift of Richard A. Simms.

How a drawings show takes shape. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Royal Cavities: The Bitter Implications of Sugar Consumption in Early Modern Europe

Dentist / Jan van der Bruggen
Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

The sweet tooth of European royalty and its rotten consequences. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

Comestibles—With a Side of Comedy—in Medieval and Renaissance Theater

The Arsehole delivers an ultimatum to The Man and his Senses
Photo courtesy of and © Sharon King

Gluttony, tall tales, and raunchy humor on the classical stage. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Double-Sided Drawing Brings a Baron to Life

Detail of face of Portrait of Charles Benjamin de Langes de Montmirail, Baron de Lubieres / Liotard
Pastel on the verso (back) of the drawing is visible in the baron's skin tones

The hidden artistry of an 18th-century pastel. More»

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Also posted in Art, Art & Archives, Getty Research Institute

The Original Turducken

Feast with stuffed ox / Hogenber
Feast with stuffed ox (detail), 1530, in Nicholas Hogenber, Procession of Pope Clement VII and the Emperor Charles V after the coronation at Bologna on the 24th February, MDXXX. Hand-colored etching pasted on canvas scroll. The Getty Research Institute

What’s going on here? More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, J. Paul Getty Museum

A Smartly Costumed Soldier and His Fierce Cat

An Azappo Archer with a Cheetah
An Azappo Archer with a Cheetah, about 1575, Jacopo Ligozzi. Brush, pen and brown ink, tempera colors, and painted gold, 11 1/16 x 8 3/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 91.GG.53

An extraordinary portrait of a Turkish soldier and his feline sidekick. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations

Celebrating Sugar in “The Edible Monument”

Marcia Reed and Ivan Day
Marcia Reed and Ivan Day installing the sugar sculpture in The Edible Monument

Talking sugar with the chief curator of the Getty Research Institute. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Editor's Picks, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

The Weird and Wonderful Edible Monuments of Early Modern Europe

Festa della Porchetta in Bologna / Belmondo

When architecture was made of food. More»

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Also posted in Art & Archives, Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Research Institute

This Just In: A Sugar Sculpture in Technicolor

Detail of etching of sugar sculpture / Teyler after Lenardi

A fantastic episode from the history of edible propaganda. More»

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      Clocking in at a giant 400 square feet, this tapestry, Triumph of Bacchus, teems with tiny details and hidden narratives.

      Here are just three:

      • At bottom center, Bacchus poses on the world’s largest wine fountain.
      • To the left, a sad, Eeyore-like donkey waits for satyrs and men to unload grapes from his back.
      • To the right, a rowdy monkey rides a camel that carries wooden barrels—presumably to be filled with wine.

      The tapestry is one of the highlights of the exhibition Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV. (L.A. folks: final weekend!)

      More on The Iris: A Tour of the Triumph of Bacchus

      Triumph of Bacchus (overall view and details), about 1560, design by Giovanni da Udine under the supervision of Raphael; woven at the workshop of Frans Geubels, Brussels. Wool, silk, and gilt metal-wrapped thread. Courtesy of Le Mobilier National. Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis

      04/29/16

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