Behind the Scenes

Inside the work of the Getty, from international field projects to maintaining the gardens

Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings, Publications

The Naughtier Side of French Printmaking

Guillaume de Limoges / Girard Audran
Guillaume de Limoges, ca. 1693–95, Girard Audran. Etching and engraving, 49.8 x 33.1 cm. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Département des Estampes et de la Photographie, Réserve Ed-66a-fol. Photo credit: BnF

The raunchy and the rustic in 17th-century prints. More»

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Also posted in Getty Foundation

Multicultural Undergraduate Intern Diary: Emily Butts

Emily Butts at the Getty Foundation

Interns in their own words. More»

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Also posted in Art, Getty Research Institute, Research

“Who is this man named J. P. Getty?” M. Knoedler & Co. and Getty the Collector

Portrait of James Christie (1730 - 1803)
Portrait of James Christie, 1778, Thomas Gainsborough. Oil on canvas, 50 1/4 x 40 1/4 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Gift of J. Paul Getty, 70.PA.16

J. Paul Getty, the mysterious art hunter. More»

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Also posted in Art, Education, J. Paul Getty Museum

What’s the Value of a Museum Field Trip?

High school students in conversation with docent Barbara Atherton as they examine the Bust of Commodus.
High school students in conversation with docent Barbara Atherton as they examine the Bust of Commodus.

Do museum field trips really have value? More»

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Also posted in Exhibitions and Installations, Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Research Institute

14 Fascinating Facts about the Cave Temples of Dunhuang

Interior and sculpture of a bodhisattva in Cave 275 / Cave Temples of Dunhuang
© The Dunhuang Academy

A look at one of the cultural and artistic wonders of the world. More»

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Also posted in Gardens and Architecture, Getty Center

Getty Gardens: Brown Is the New Green

Green and brown flowers and rocks in the Getty's Central Garden

To adapt to the California drought, the Getty gardens team embraces the brown. More»

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Also posted in Getty Research Institute, Prints and Drawings

Roasting the Sun King

The Admiral of France, De France Admiraal / unknown artist
Bibliothèque nationale de France

Propaganda against Louis XIV cleverly appropriated his own symbols of power. More»

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Posted in Behind the Scenes

Help Us Improve the Getty Iris

iris_survey_graphic_lg

Tell us what you really think. More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Opposites Attract

Tarascon / Charles Tarascon
Tarascon, 1852, Charles Nègre. Waxed paper negative with selectively applied pigment, 9 5/16 x 13 1/16 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2015.43.9

For 19th-century photographers, the negative was the true work of art. More»

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Also posted in Getty Villa

Experiencing Outdoor Theater at the Getty Villa

Drama at dusk at the Getty Villa

A taste of the outdoor theater experience at the Getty Villa. More»

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      Olympian Census #4: Aphrodite

      Get the stats on your favorite (and not-so-favorite) gods and goddesses on view at the Getty Center.

      Roman name: Venus

      Employment: Goddess of Love and Beauty

      Place of residence: Mount Olympus

      Parents: Born out of sea foam formed when Uranus’s castrated genitals were thrown into the ocean

      Marital status: Married to Hephaestus, the God of Blacksmiths, but had many lovers, both immortal and mortal

      Offspring: Aeneas, Cupid, Eros, Harmonia, Hermaphroditos, and more

      Symbol: Dove, swan, and roses

      Special talent: Being beautiful and sexy could never have been easier for this Greek goddess

      Highlights reel:

      • Zeus knew she was trouble when she walked in (Sorry, Taylor Swift) to Mount Olympus for the first time. So Zeus married Aphrodite to his son Hephaestus (Vulcan), forming the perfect “Beauty and the Beast” couple.
      • When Aphrodite and Persephone, the queen of the underworld, both fell in love with the beautiful mortal boy Adonis, Zeus gave Adonis the choice to live with one goddess for 1/3 of the year and the other for 2/3. Adonis chose to live with Aphrodite longer, only to die young.
      • Aphrodite offered Helen, the most beautiful mortal woman, to Paris, a Trojan prince, to win the Golden Apple from him over Hera and Athena. She just conveniently forgot the fact that Helen was already married. Oops. Hello, Trojan War!

      Olympian Census is a 12-part series profiling gods in art at the Getty Center.

      08/03/15

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