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Also posted in Art

Bringing Barbara Kruger’s “Whose Values” into the Classroom

Student with a Whose Values tag

A new lesson plan brings Barbara Kruger’s question-based art project to life for teachers and students More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

What’s the Value of a Museum Field Trip?

High school students in conversation with docent Barbara Atherton as they examine the Bust of Commodus.
High school students in conversation with docent Barbara Atherton as they examine the Bust of Commodus.

Do museum field trips really have value? More»

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Also posted in Getty Center, Getty Villa, Getty360

Summer Family Fun at the Getty

Family enjoying Garden Concerts for Kids at the Getty
Family enjoying Garden Concerts for Kids

Free summer activities for kids and parents at the Getty Center and Getty Villa More»

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Also posted in J. Paul Getty Museum, Photographs, Film, and Video

Light and Cameraless Action: Community Photoworks 2015

Cyanotype by Quinten Klein
Cyanotype by Quinten Klein

High school students explore cameraless photography with artist Christine Nguyen. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Be a Fool for Art

#MusePose - Ideal Female Heads
Ideal female heads x4

More fun posing with art! More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, Getty Villa

Peacocks and Mosaics

Artist Karen Silton holding pieces of porcelain used to create a mosaic
Artist Karen Silton holding pieces of porcelain used to create a mosaic

An artist teams up with Getty visitors to create a mosaic for the community. More»

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Also posted in Art, Behind the Scenes, J. Paul Getty Museum, Manuscripts and Books

Expanding Access: Devotion and Objects

blogDH0A1977

A medieval Qur’an and a study day for American Muslim scholars. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Chocolate, The Food of the Gods

chocolate-avocado cake with ganache

Eating chocolate, from Moctezuma to Marie-Antoinette. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

19 New Videos Show How to Engage Students with Art

Teaching Channel videos behind the scenes

How to teach with art, for teachers and parents. More»

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Also posted in Art, J. Paul Getty Museum

Strike a #MusePose!

Air / Aristide Maillol #MusePose challenge
Audrey Chan and Kelly Williams strike a #MusePose duet! Sculpture: Air, designed 1938, cast 1962, Aristide Maillol. Lead, 94 in. long. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2005.113.1

Get arty with your selfies in this new #MusePose Instagram challenge! More»

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      It’s been 125 years since Van Gogh’s death, today we celebrate his life’s work.


      5 Ways to See Van Gogh’s Irises

      Through observations, visitor conversations, and some sneaky eavesdropping, we’ve compiled the top 5 ways people enjoy this painting.

      1. In a Crowd
        One of the most obvious ways that people see the painting is in a crowd. The gallery is almost always filled, and you might have to wait before you can get up close. The anticipation builds as you start in the back row, and slowly move until you are close enough to see the brushstrokes of Van Gogh’s thick paint.

      2. Online
        David from Colorado said that this was his first visit, but he had already seen the painting online. In addition to being available through the Getty’s Open Content program, the painting is often seen on social media. Just search #irises on Instagram for a taste of the painting’s popularity. 

      3. Alone
        If you arrive right at 10 a.m. when the museum opens, the quiet gallery provides a perfect backdrop to really examine the painting. Solitude and seclusion gives the gallery a sense of intimacy. 

      4. Multiple Times
        Repeat visits can give rise to multiple interpretations. Is it a melancholy or joyous painting? Expressive or depressive? 

      5. Internationally
        Visitors from all across the world viewed this famous Van Gogh. In just one hour you can hear multiple languages—French, Italian, Chinese, Korean, German, and more. Irises seems to rise above cultural boundaries—a Dutch painting inspired by Japanese ukiyo-e prints—to strike an emotional resonance amongst all viewers. 

      What is your favorite lens to view Van Gogh’s work through? 

      07/29/15

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