Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust More»

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

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      What did death mean in Ancient life?

      An exhibition that looks at death and funerary practice through thirteen elaborate Apulian vases from Southern Italy now on view in Dangerous Perfection: Funerary Vases from Southern Italy!

      Funerary Vessel , South Italian, from Apulia, 340-310 B.C., terracotta red-figured volute krater< attributed to the Phrixos Group. Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      Funerary Vessel, South Italian, from Apulia, 350-325 B.C., terracotta red figured amphora attributed to the Darius Painter (the Hecuba Sub-Group).Image © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Antikensammlung. Photo: Johannes Laurentius

      11/22/14

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