Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust More»

Chinese scholar and Connecting Art Histories participant Liang Guo views frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

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      Vermeer’s interiors make possible a sort of encounter in which the painting completely disappears in the viewing, and the viewer is what is seen into, and this is the key to Vermeer’s true design and the source of his work’s mystery.“

      —poet Michael White

      The Milkmaid, ca, 1660. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

      Woman Reading a Letter, ca. 1663. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

      Young Woman with a Water Pitcher, ca. 1662. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Marquand Collection, Gift of Henry G. Marquand, 1889. www.metmuseum.org

      03/28/15

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