Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust More»

Connecting Art Histories participants studying frescoes in the Casa Vasari palace in Florence, Italy. © J. Paul Getty Trust

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